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Cardiology Imaging System Pioneers Introduce New Storage Paradigm for Healthcare at HIMSS

Revolutionary New Ultra-Efficient Storage Appliance Ideal for Healthcare IT Applications

ASHAWAY, RI -- (Marketwire) -- 04/06/09 -- greenBytes, a developer of next-generation data storage solutions founded by digital cardiology pioneers from Heartlab Incorporated, today announced Cypress for Healthcare IT, the most efficient data storage system available on the market. Cypress is an ultra high-efficiency NAS (network attached storage) appliance for archiving long-term, persistent data, often found in hospital data storage environments. Cypress combines its industry-leading software storage operating system with Sun Microsystems' award-winning Sun Fire(TM) X4540 storage server to create the densest, highest-performing storage platform for medical records storage.

Cypress brings together real-time data de-duplication and MAID (massive array of idle disks) technology to achieve dramatic reductions in the space, power, time and money required to store persistent data. Unlike other de-duplication and MAID products, Cypress is built on top of the Sun Fire(TM) platform, providing for tremendous economy -- 50% of the acquisition cost, yet no compromise on performance -- up to twice as fast as other storage platforms.

Ideal for the complicated data storage topologies of large health care institutions, Cypress can be used in PACS, Backup Operations, Disaster Recovery, Document Management and Virtual Machine consolidation applications. De-duplication and MAID features reduce hospital operating costs further by reducing the storage footprint and saving tens of thousands of dollars annually on electrical costs.

"Our healthcare customers (at Heartlab) were dealing with an explosion of digital information from their advanced imaging systems," said Robert Petrocelli, CTO and co-founder of greenBytes and Heartlab. "Understanding our customers' problems has always been essential in providing solutions as the healthcare industry moved from analog to digital. Cypress meets the uniquely demanding storage needs of the healthcare industry -- where it is not uncommon to store 10 to 40 TB per year, with a seven-year retention requirement."

Cypress enables enterprises to realize more than just operational savings on energy -- they achieve reductions in the total cost of ownership (TCO) of right-sized power-efficient storage, including lower labor costs for administration and maintenance, lower hardware and software support costs by consolidation of tier-2 storage on a single application platform, and the ability to reduce or eliminate the need to upgrade facilities.

Key product features of the Cypress storage system include:

--  Real-Time In-Line De-Duplication, native to ZFS+, saves energy by
    reducing capacity requirements in the first place.

--  Power-State-Aware Disk Sets, which permit most disks in a large array
    to be in an energy-saving state with predictable performance and power

--  Block-Level Compression, which achieves an average compression ratio
    of 2 to 1 on many common types of files, thus reducing capacity and related
    energy consumption by up to 50%.

--  Remote Replication, which automates the differential replication of
    individual users' file systems to network-attached Cypress filers.

--  Intuitive Interface, which greatly simplifies the setup, management
    and surveillance of storage.

--  CIFS/NFS High-Performance File-Sharing as well as ISCSI targets, which
    makes it a snap for enterprise storage managers to administer user file
    access permissions in Windows and Unix environments alike.

"We are pleased to work with greenBytes to help healthcare institutions manage data more economically, effectively and ecologically than ever before," said Joe Hartley, Vice President, Global Government, Education and Healthcare. "Our focus on innovation has allowed us to exponentially increase our systems' storage capacity while lowering the cost. This is an important step in advancing the healthcare industry through improved management of patient data."

greenBytes will be exhibiting at the HIMSS09 annual conference in the Sun Microsystems' pavilion, booth # 1210.

About greenBytes, Inc.

greenBytes, Inc. has developed the world's most efficient storage system that enables enterprises to manage their persistent data more economically, effectively and ecologically than ever before. greenBytes has leveraged its breakthrough proprietary software in combination with open technologies to create a storage solution that dramatically reduces power consumption and increases density, allowing companies to reduce the carbon footprint of their information. For more information, visit:

For additional information, contact:

Jordon Devita
SVM Public Relations
Email Contact

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