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i-Technology Viewpoint: We Must Get Beyond "Binary Extremes," Says Sun's COO

Open Source or Proprietary? That's not an either/or choice any more, says Sun's Jonathan Schwartz

He's been doing it again. Blogging, that is. And, as usual, Sun's president and COO zeroes in on the main issue that makes the software industry the endlessly fascinating place it is, anno 2004, namely the choice between proprietary and open source solutions.

It's not an either/or choice, Schwartz contends, and refers to a surprising moment that happened at Sun's JavaOne developer conference earlier this year.

"A bunch of friends joined us for a discussion on the open sourcing of Java," writes Schwartz in the latest entry in his widely-read blog: "Among the luminaries present was Brian Behlendorf, who opened his statements by asking what I'm sure he felt was a question with a popular answer, 'How many of you work on an open source project?' I expected to see a flurry of hands, and I'm sure he did, too. Neither of us saw hands go up."

Schwartz cites this as just one example of how you can't stereotype the software development community, even if you think you can. When you think it's a mixture of open-source and proprietary users, it can turn out to be proprietary only. And vice versa.

"There are those that persist in trying to draw the industry as filled with binary extremes," Schwartz observes. "I choose to see it differently - the network reaches a market so broad, there can never be one definition, one product or one market."

Schwartz mentions another example, the flip side if you like.

This time it involves an incident that took place when he was keynoting a CIO event in Cincinatti a few weeks back:

"The event was attended by a cross section of American companies, from retailers to pharmaceutical companies, logistics and airlines. Toward the end of my prepared remarks, I started previewing the open sourcing of Solaris (and our Red Hat upgrade programs, just for fun). One of the CIOs stopped me to ask, 'why are you open sourcing Solaris? The last thing I want is more source code.' My response, 'No offense intended, but you're not my target demographic. It's your developers, and they'd love the ability to see/evolve the source.'"

Schwartz has been making the headlines regularly with his blogging, most recently when, in an entry titled "I believe in IP," he made a declaration that Sun very shortly afterwards backed up with a $92M payment to Eastman Kodak Co.:

"I believe in intellectual property. In my view, it's the foundation of world economies, and certainly the foundation upon which Sun Microsystems was built. Copyright, trademark, patent - I believe in them all. I also believe in innovation and competition - and that these beliefs are not mutually exclusive."

"If you look at Sun's business," Schwartz continued in that September 30 blog, "all we really are, like most of our peers in the technology industry (and the media and entertainment industries with which we're converging), is an intellectual property fountain. Pour money in the top, some of the world's most talented people go to work, intellectual property falls out the other end. We happen to turn our IP into storage and servers and software and services - but realistically, that's what our manufacturing and service partners do for us. All Sun ultimately does is create ideas, design systems and engage communities."

What goes for Sun, obviously, goes for Eastman Kodak, which purchased the patents disputed in its case against Sun from Wang Laboratories in 1997 when it bought Wang's imaging software business for $260 million and was looking for restitution in the damages part of the trial to the tune of $1.06 billion in past royalties, which Kodak's lawyers calculated represented half of Sun's operating profit from the sales of computer servers and storage equipment between January 1998 and June 2001.

As we now all know, the following week Sun settled the case. For $92M.

As Schwartz blogged before the settlement: "I continue to believe in the protection of ideas conveyed by patents. From drug discovery to academic work, the protection of IP is part and parcel of what incents inventors to invent, and investors to invest."

He was as good as his word.

In this latest blog, too, he would seem to be adopting a plain-speaking approach that is likely to find favor with the developer community.

"There is no single definition of 'user' that encompasses the diversity of the constituencies we [at Sun] serve, or our means of doing so," he continues, in this current essay:

"Note that with the Tiger release of J2SE, the newest NetBeans gathering momentum (and Eclipse converts), and the unveiling of Java Creator, each product uses a different development and licensing model, appropriate to its objectives. J2SE is the result of an extraordinary collaboration between a vibrant and inclusive community, the most pervasive on the net (just go check out who belongs to the Java Community Process). NetBeans is the product of a traditionally defined open source community, churning out enhancements under a vastly different governance model. And then there's Java Studio Creator, built by Sun, just by Sun, as a means of driving to market a Java development tool for fans seeking an open, cross-platform alternative to Visual Basic."
The Java developer, in other words, is served by Sun three different ways. And this is Schwartz's overall point. Again, that key sentence: "The network reaches a market so broad, there can never be one definition, one product or one market."

Once again this looks certain to become a very widely-quoted blog.

More Stories By Jeremy Geelan

Jeremy Geelan is Chairman & CEO of the 21st Century Internet Group, Inc. and an Executive Academy Member of the International Academy of Digital Arts & Sciences. Formerly he was President & COO at Cloud Expo, Inc. and Conference Chair of the worldwide Cloud Expo series. He appears regularly at conferences and trade shows, speaking to technology audiences across six continents. You can follow him on twitter: @jg21.

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Most Recent Comments
thY762 10/26/04 05:47:20 PM EDT

I think that I would like to be a CEO and a blogger, this seems like FUN

Roller Update 10/26/04 11:58:47 AM EDT

anyone know if Roller is still on for its planned 1.0RC1 release this week?

The answer is yes

Before the RC1 release, dave hopes to update the Installation Guide and to write up a summary of the many changes made since the last release - which was 0.9.8.3

on the websphere question, Jeff Chilton has written about it - maybe someone has the link?

QueZZtion 10/26/04 11:34:04 AM EDT

Talking of Dave Dave Johnson anyone know if Roller is still on for its planned 1.0RC1 release this week? Also, can Roller be ported to WebSphere -anyone know?

Competition Idea 10/26/04 11:14:18 AM EDT

Personally what I'd like to see most is a "blog-off" between Larry Ellison and Scott McNealy and Bill Gates to see which of the three can engage and inform me most! I guess they won't want to use Roller, though, given Sun's now hired David Johnson fulltime.

underdog 10/26/04 10:50:30 AM EDT

He's not as well known as John Patrick let alone Billy G but David Scott Anderson, CEO of the curiously named international consulting and technology development company Grupo Utopia, maintains a daily blogcalled "In Search of Utopia" on his company's Web site. He's a tech guy but there's plenty of politics - yesterday it was combatively titled "Stealing the Election 2004 Edition" for example. This is CEO blog-activism, at its rawest.

JPatrickRocks 10/26/04 10:09:23 AM EDT

How can everyone be forgetting about former Vice President of Internet technology at IBM, now President of Attitude LLC, John Patrick? His blog is a hymn to the next-generation Internet. A veritable must-read.

GoooooooooMavs 10/26/04 09:20:11 AM EDT

r u guts all living in a cave or something?? The only CEO blogger worth considering is Mark Cuban - you know, billionaire businessman and owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team. Blog Maverick he calls it. Go take a look/read - it's an informative, feisty read! :)

Top Dog 10/26/04 09:06:18 AM EDT

The top CEO blogger? Duh! Who else but Craig Newmark the CEO of Craiglist, which employs only 14 people yet makes about $25 million per year on just 12 percent of its available ad inventory? No wonder eBay bought %25 of it.

BlogeursRule 10/26/04 07:57:30 AM EDT

Apparently no one here is a CEO or they'd already know about The International Club of CEO Bloggers which seems to be the work of (what else) a CEO. Guillaume du Gardier describes himself as "CEO and Blogger" - for the curious, CEO Bloggers' Clubcomes out in French as "Club des PDG Blogueurs" (so now you know!)

Bill's BLog? 10/26/04 07:41:33 AM EDT

Hehe, clearly no-one here lives like me in Seattle, or you would already know that Blogzilla is about to enter the field: according to Brier Dudley, a Seattle Times technology reporter, one William H. Gates III is about to our-blog every blogger in cyberspace:

Bill Gates could join the ranks of bloggers
Bill Gates has a reputation for coming late to the party, then making a big splash when he arrives.
That's what happened after the Microsoft chairman realized the potential of the Internet. And it may happen again if he starts his personal Web log. Yes, the world's richest man may start his own blog

This report is from just last Friday. Watch out, world!!

BolgLOGb 10/26/04 07:17:08 AM EDT

He is a brave blogger. Maybe JDJ would like to conduct a poll and establish whether anyone else is blogging as often and as honestly as Jonathan Schwartz. I know that Michael Robertson at Lindows does one, who else? I mean at COO or CEO level, not just the Microsoft bloggers or the Sun bloggers en masse.

pachi 10/25/04 02:21:47 PM EDT

No one raised hands probably because most software is created as in-house development... so neither is open software nor it is proprietary software... Plainly it's software not released at all.
In that case probably the benefits of following an FOSS model would be greater if only you date to spend some effort publishing the code.

Blue dog 10/25/04 12:27:07 PM EDT

Sun is siting on both sides of the fence now. It will be interesting to see if "the community" is comfortable with that - after all, it is comfortable with IBM doing the same, why not Sun?

BlogThat! 10/25/04 04:43:17 AM EDT

Another power blogger is Alan Meckler. Anyone remember his massive attack last year on a Las Vegas hotel chain that he felt had sabotaged the commercial success of his rival event to Comdex. Hell hath no fury like a blogger scorned!

Blogospherical 10/25/04 04:09:08 AM EDT

According to this report from Business 2.0 Schwartz's blog reaches more than 100,000 readers per month. The article calls him "a blogging addict" and says that there are now 5,000 serious corporate blogs like Schwartz's.

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