Welcome!

Microservices Expo Authors: Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Gopala Krishna Behara, Sridhar Chalasani

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, @DevOpsSummit

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

Journey to the Cloud, Better with Incident Management |@CloudExpo #Agile #CloudNative

There are many paths organizations can take when migrating to the cloud

Journey to the Cloud, Better with Incident Management
By Vince Power

Many IT organizations have come to learn that leveraging cloud infrastructure is not just unavoidable, it’s one of the most effective paths for IT organizations to become more responsive to business needs.

Yet with the cloud comes new challenges, including minimizing downtime, decreasing the cost of operations, and preventing employee burnout to name a few. As companies migrate their processes and procedures to their new reality of a cloud-based infrastructure, an incident management solution can and should be adopted to help overcome these challenges. This is particularly true when larger enterprises operate with a hybrid environment, which mixes traditional infrastructure with cloud-based infrastructure and, by extension, requires a hybrid approach to incident management. It takes time to migrate to the cloud, it’s not something that can be done in one sweep.

Let’s take a look at why organizations are embracing this new paradigm and migrating to the cloud, as well as how they’re handling incident management for a seamless cloud migration.

Why make the move to the cloud?
There are many paths organizations can take when migrating to the cloud — from development teams looking at cloud-native apps, to infrastructure teams looking at different combinations of private and public clouds and how to build a hybrid infrastructure to interconnect them. Let’s take a quick look at some of the benefits migrating to the cloud offers:

  • Reduced Infrastructure Management: By leveraging cloud services, employees are freed up from having to patch and maintain underpinning components and able to focus instead on providing business value.
  • Increased Agility: The ability to update, add, and remove services on top of a cloud infrastructure drastically changes how fast businesses can respond to new opportunities.
  • Cloud-Native Apps: Combining agile development practices with continuous integration, continuous delivery, and microservices allows teams to deliver business functionality at a speed and scale that make sense.
  • Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity: Leveraging cloud infrastructure’s built-in data replication features allows for secondary sites primed for rapid recovery. Over time, this can morph into having applications running in multiple availability zones, or full regions.
  • Always-On: Cloud services are generally up 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with no extra effort or staffing required beyond the migration to the service.
  • No Capital Investment: Cloud services work on a subscription basis, which eliminates major capital expenditures, and moves costs to operational budgets without the need to deal with amortization and depreciation. The cloud service provider maintains the physical environment, with all the capital expenses that would entail.
  • Reduced Time-to-Market: Without the full purchase cycle that goes along with a capital expenditure, teams can start testing new ideas in days, as opposed to traditional models, which can mean weeks or months of lead time.

Moving to the cloud makes sense for many organizations — both big and small — as the benefits it provides allows businesses to be more agile. Moving to the cloud is becoming a matter of when, not if. As a result, IT teams must learn how to build, operate, and support applications within this new paradigm.

Get real-time visibility into your cloud environment
Not having an incident management processes in place before and after a migration to the cloud can often lead to blind spots and cause delays in incident response when issues arise. These issues can lead to risk to the business, impact to customers, and delays in the migration process. And once you have a hybrid infrastructure, or have completely moved to a public cloud infrastructure, these weaknesses will start to interfere with real incident response if left unaddressed. It’s crucial to manage hybrid cloud environments with effective incident response, so you can get real-time visibility into what’s working in your cloud-based applications and taking action if an issue happens during or after migration.

Incident management challenges during cloud migration
As we mentioned, migrating to the cloud comes with its own set of new challenges to overcome, including:

Integrating with cloud infrastructure providers and monitoring
With the introduction of cloud-native apps into an organization’s application portfolio, it is essential to be able to see and report on all its instances across multiple cloud providers, even as it dynamically adds and removes instances. It’s not only important to pull in signals from modern, cloud-based tools, it’s just as important to pull in digital signals from more traditional tools, as organizations are likely to exist in a hybrid environment. This is a huge risk during migration, as not all applications will migrate at the same time, but in order to deliver an existing service or app, both on-premises and cloud components are needed.

Solution: Have an incident management platform that understands and can integrate with modern and traditional application performance management suites and the native tooling that all cloud infrastructures have available.

Always-on means always supported
Customers have grown accustomed to an always-on experience, they expect their services to be generally available 24/7, and they won’t hesitate to become vocal about not wanting to wait until Monday morning to report a problem.

Solution: Invest in an incident management platform which is built to handle 24/7 support, and can handle knowing who to notify on which team when a monitoring solution proactively detects a fault, or even when a client submits an incident. Then, support that team through the lifecycle of the incident response.

Cloud visibility
Now that more services are available from cloud-based providers, how do you ensure your team has the visibility they need into events and alerts within supporting applications, middleware, and infrastructure to allow them to head-off issues before customers are impacted or your projects are delayed?

Solution: Invest in solutions that can consume information from multiple sources and support your team’s ability to see into the impact of issues. It’s important to make sure your responders have the right information to take action and minimize the risk to the business and project teams. This ensures the cloud migration lifecycle is moving quickly and that quality application changes are introduced into production.

Distributed workforce
With the cloud comes a more mobile-friendly platform, and with more and more organizations with multiple geographically dispersed offices, having a single unified and centralized communication channel is key.

Solution: It doesn’t matter if it is a traditional telephony conference bridge, or more modern collaboration solutions like Slack or HipChat. The goal is one place to find the people you need to talk to. The benefits of a tool like Slack or HipChat are integrations that hook into incident management and monitoring solutions to bring information and action into the chat without leaving the conversation.

As part of any cloud migration, it is important to consider the needs of supporting teams at the same tier as the needs of the developers and business units pushing for the change. If the supporting teams don’t have all the processes and tools they need to stand behind what the developers are deploying, then all the added layers of complexity are of zero value to the business, because they can’t be used reliably.

The post Journey to the Cloud, Better with Incident Management appeared first on PagerDuty.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By PagerDuty Blog

PagerDuty’s operations performance platform helps companies increase reliability. By connecting people, systems and data in a single view, PagerDuty delivers visibility and actionable intelligence across global operations for effective incident resolution management. PagerDuty has over 100 platform partners, and is trusted by Fortune 500 companies and startups alike, including Microsoft, National Instruments, Electronic Arts, Adobe, Rackspace, Etsy, Square and Github.

Microservices Articles
The now mainstream platform changes stemming from the first Internet boom brought many changes but didn’t really change the basic relationship between servers and the applications running on them. In fact, that was sort of the point. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, Gordon Haff, senior cloud strategy marketing and evangelism manager at Red Hat, will discuss how today’s workloads require a new model and a new platform for development and execution. The platform must handle a wide range of rec...
More and more companies are looking to microservices as an architectural pattern for breaking apart applications into more manageable pieces so that agile teams can deliver new features quicker and more effectively. What this pattern has done more than anything to date is spark organizational transformations, setting the foundation for future application development. In practice, however, there are a number of considerations to make that go beyond simply “build, ship, and run,” which changes how...
CloudEXPO New York 2018, colocated with DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City and will bring together Cloud Computing, FinTech and Blockchain, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, AI, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location.
DevOpsSummit New York 2018, colocated with CloudEXPO | DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City. Digital Transformation (DX) is a major focus with the introduction of DXWorldEXPO within the program. Successful transformation requires a laser focus on being data-driven and on using all the tools available that enable transformation if they plan to survive over the long term.
Adding public cloud resources to an existing application can be a daunting process. The tools that you currently use to manage the software and hardware outside the cloud aren’t always the best tools to efficiently grow into the cloud. All of the major configuration management tools have cloud orchestration plugins that can be leveraged, but there are also cloud-native tools that can dramatically improve the efficiency of managing your application lifecycle. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, ...
Traditional IT, great for stable systems of record, is struggling to cope with newer, agile systems of engagement requirements coming straight from the business. In his session at 18th Cloud Expo, William Morrish, General Manager of Product Sales at Interoute, will outline ways of exploiting new architectures to enable both systems and building them to support your existing platforms, with an eye for the future. Technologies such as Docker and the hyper-convergence of computing, networking and...
While some developers care passionately about how data centers and clouds are architected, for most, it is only the end result that matters. To the majority of companies, technology exists to solve a business problem, and only delivers value when it is solving that problem. 2017 brings the mainstream adoption of containers for production workloads. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Ben McCormack, VP of Operations at Evernote, discussed how data centers of the future will be managed, how the p...
Containers and Kubernetes allow for code portability across on-premise VMs, bare metal, or multiple cloud provider environments. Yet, despite this portability promise, developers may include configuration and application definitions that constrain or even eliminate application portability. In this session we'll describe best practices for "configuration as code" in a Kubernetes environment. We will demonstrate how a properly constructed containerized app can be deployed to both Amazon and Azure ...
As Enterprise business moves from Monoliths to Microservices, adoption and successful implementations of Microservices become more evident. The goal of Microservices is to improve software delivery speed and increase system safety as scale increases. Documenting hurdles and problems for the use of Microservices will help consultants, architects and specialists to avoid repeating the same mistakes and learn how and when to use (or not use) Microservices at the enterprise level. The circumstance w...
"We do one of the best file systems in the world. We learned how to deal with Big Data many years ago and we implemented this knowledge into our software," explained Jakub Ratajczak, Business Development Manager at MooseFS, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.