Welcome!

Microservices Expo Authors: Flint Brenton, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Charles Araujo

Related Topics: @DevOpsSummit, Microservices Expo, Linux Containers, Containers Expo Blog

@DevOpsSummit: Article

Spread the DevOps Virus | @DevOpsSummit #Agile #DevOps #Microservices

Simply changing may not be good enough. Instead, CEOs must ask whether they should make change a core competency.

Finally, the conclusion: part two of my Cortex newsletter, Spread the DevOps Virus in Your Organization. In part one, I called for expanding the hard-fought organizational lessons of DevOps to the rest of the enterprise. Allow people to choose their own teams, and to allow teams to choose their own goals, I exhorted - self-organization being the key to driving agility at the organizational level.

That article, however, focused on the participants on such teams. What does it mean for you as an individual to join with colleagues and organize yourselves into teams that can address the challenges of your organization?

So far so good - but to allow people to choose their own teams, someone has to do the allowing. In other words, management.

If the DevOps virus infects our entire enterprise, will we end up with some sort of Lord of the Flies arrangement, with nobody in charge? Sorry to disappoint - we still need management. Clearly, however, their role transforms as well. Here are some pointers for the managers.

Why Self-Organize?
For CEOs, making such a profound decision to move an entire enterprise's hierarchical structure to a flat, self-organizational model should not be taken lightly. Therefore, it's essential to understand why an organization should - or should not - transform in such a way.

Fundamentally, self-organization is the key to building large organizations that are inherently agile.

After all, given enough motivation and resources, any organization can change from one state to another. The question CEOs must ask is not just whether they should change, but whether it's important for their organizations to be better at changing than they are today.

Simply changing may not be good enough. Instead, CEOs must ask whether they should take Google CIO Ben Fried's advice and make change a core competency.

Today most enterprises are undergoing massive shifts under the name digital transformation. Let's say you successfully navigate this transformation. Will you be done? Of course not - change will be ongoing and even accelerating.

So, is it good enough to struggle through one transformation after another? Or is the more strategic decision to become better able to deal with such change - in other words, to be more agile?

For most organizations, perhaps, the answer is obviously yes - but for other companies, the risks inherent in making change a core competency outweigh the rewards. It may seem that the business and technology disruptions all around us apply to every business to be sure, but yours may be an exception.

Furthermore, self-organization is one of the most important enablers of business agility, but it isn't suitable for every organization. Also, not all of a large organization necessarily has to be self-organized to be inherently agile.

Depending upon the nature of your business, other forms of organization may be better suited for particular departments, especially of that part of your business isn't subject to the sorts of disruptive change that are driving digital transformation for so many enterprises.

The CEO - or perhaps the C-suite with the help of the board of directors - must therefore answer two questions: how strategic is business agility for their organization, and if they decide that digital transformation is essential, then what parts of the organization must transform.

Mind this important caveat: for any enterprise to be successful at their digital transformation efforts, ‘slow' IT must transform. If the existing IT organization cannot rise to the challenge of supporting the digital efforts, then those efforts will fail, plain and simple. See my Cortex Fixing Slow the Agile Digital Transformation Way for more details.

Furthermore, if management decides that business agility is a priority and thus change must become a core competency, then the IT organization must move to a self-organizational model in order to deal better with change overall. Good thing, therefore, that DevOps begins in the IT department.

How to Manage Self-Organization
Once the top brass have determined the strategic need for business agility in the organization, it's time to get management up to speed - from the C-suite all the way down to middle management. Here are the basics:

  • Mind the transition to self-organization. This change won't happen overnight, and won't take place everywhere you'd like it to. Start by encouraging DevOps to flourish. Then follow the contagion model, where the people who are self-organizing get up to speed on what works and gradually draw other people in. As self-organization begins to take hold outside the software development organization, continue to empower people who want to solve problems along the same lines.
  • Stop managing - that is, stop doing many of those things that people might think of as a traditional way of managing. Don't assign people to teams or assign tasks to teams or to people. Also, don't establish success criteria for teams, either - self-organizing teams should do that for themselves.
  • Ensure that you properly distill and communicate the strategic goals of the organization. The challenge here is to keep the focus on the goals but not the ‘how.' You want your people to figure out the ‘how' for themselves.
  • Make sure everybody has the resources (money, people, and technology) that they need. Think of yourself as the butler, ready to serve. If you find yourself in a resource constrained situation, then call upon the teams who are battling for a scarce resource to work together to properly allocate that resource - until, of course, the affected teams realize they can figure out this allocation for themselves.
  • Delineate the necessary constraints, for example, regulatory requirements, security priorities, even technology capacity goals. Treat such constraints as boundary conditions - that is, constraints may not be negotiable, but they're only relevant if teams are butting up against them.
  • Join teams. Anyone in your organization - including management - can join a team, or form a new team if they feel a particular task is important but nobody else is taking care of it. Remember, however, that rank hath no privileges on self-organizing teams. The team may elect you leader or not as they see fit.
  • Some managers will find themselves in the difficult position of having to deal with people who aren't participating or who get kicked off too many teams. The key to resolving this particularly knotty challenge: pay people to leave. In fact, you should have a standing offer to anybody who doesn't like the whole self-organization thing, including managers. In addition, you should base the amount you offer on a feedback loop that optimizes morale and productivity. Offer too little and the bad apples won't jump at the deal. Offer too much and you'll lose too many good people.

Remember, you don't have to follow all these pointers everywhere in your organization, and you have to allow a gradual phasing in of these principles. In the meantime, managers will find that they still have to manage in traditional ways to a large extent. Eventually, however, many pre-existing leaders will find themselves stepping away from their existing roles at some point to allow self-organization to evolve.

The Intellyx Take
While I've aimed this Cortex primarily at managers in large organizations, self-organization also applies to startups. In fact, you could say that every startup is necessarily self-organized, because the founders are always on the first team, thus organizing it from within.

As startups grow, however, they soon reach a critical point when the leadership team thinks they must create a new team that they don't belong to. Get this step wrong and you build inflexibility into your startup.

Fortunately, seasoned entrepreneurs know that early hires need to be self-starters who are willing to roll with the changes so common in the startup environment, which means that such teams will be comfortable self-organizing off the bat.

Large organizations struggling to transition from traditional, hierarchical organizational models to self-organizational models, however, face substantially greater challenges than startups do. The larger the organization, the greater the organizational inertia, as people simply do not like to change their behavior.

At some point, however, ‘we've always done it that way' has to give out to ‘we need to try something different.' Given today's dramatically disruptive business and technology environments, ‘trying something different' is table stakes for any digital transformation effort, and is the first step on the long road to making change a core competency in your organization.

Intellyx advises companies on their digital transformation initiatives and helps vendors communicate their agility stories. As of the time of writing, none of the organizations mentioned in this article are Intellyx customers. Image credit: Pascal and actionvance.

More Stories By Jason Bloomberg

Jason Bloomberg is a leading IT industry analyst, Forbes contributor, keynote speaker, and globally recognized expert on multiple disruptive trends in enterprise technology and digital transformation. He is ranked #5 on Onalytica’s list of top Digital Transformation influencers for 2018 and #15 on Jax’s list of top DevOps influencers for 2017, the only person to appear on both lists.

As founder and president of Agile Digital Transformation analyst firm Intellyx, he advises, writes, and speaks on a diverse set of topics, including digital transformation, artificial intelligence, cloud computing, devops, big data/analytics, cybersecurity, blockchain/bitcoin/cryptocurrency, no-code/low-code platforms and tools, organizational transformation, internet of things, enterprise architecture, SD-WAN/SDX, mainframes, hybrid IT, and legacy transformation, among other topics.

Mr. Bloomberg’s articles in Forbes are often viewed by more than 100,000 readers. During his career, he has published over 1,200 articles (over 200 for Forbes alone), spoken at over 400 conferences and webinars, and he has been quoted in the press and blogosphere over 2,000 times.

Mr. Bloomberg is the author or coauthor of four books: The Agile Architecture Revolution (Wiley, 2013), Service Orient or Be Doomed! How Service Orientation Will Change Your Business (Wiley, 2006), XML and Web Services Unleashed (SAMS Publishing, 2002), and Web Page Scripting Techniques (Hayden Books, 1996). His next book, Agile Digital Transformation, is due within the next year.

At SOA-focused industry analyst firm ZapThink from 2001 to 2013, Mr. Bloomberg created and delivered the Licensed ZapThink Architect (LZA) Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) course and associated credential, certifying over 1,700 professionals worldwide. He is one of the original Managing Partners of ZapThink LLC, which was acquired by Dovel Technologies in 2011.

Prior to ZapThink, Mr. Bloomberg built a diverse background in eBusiness technology management and industry analysis, including serving as a senior analyst in IDC’s eBusiness Advisory group, as well as holding eBusiness management positions at USWeb/CKS (later marchFIRST) and WaveBend Solutions (now Hitachi Consulting), and several software and web development positions.

@MicroservicesExpo Stories
Don’t go chasing waterfall … development, that is. According to a recent post by Madison Moore on Medium featuring insights from several software delivery industry leaders, waterfall is – while still popular – not the best way to win in the marketplace. With methodologies like Agile, DevOps and Continuous Delivery becoming ever more prominent over the past 15 years or so, waterfall is old news. Or, is it? Moore cites a recent study by Gartner: “According to Gartner’s IT Key Metrics Data report, ...
In his keynote at 19th Cloud Expo, Sheng Liang, co-founder and CEO of Rancher Labs, discussed the technological advances and new business opportunities created by the rapid adoption of containers. With the success of Amazon Web Services (AWS) and various open source technologies used to build private clouds, cloud computing has become an essential component of IT strategy. However, users continue to face challenges in implementing clouds, as older technologies evolve and newer ones like Docker c...
All organizations that did not originate this moment have a pre-existing culture as well as legacy technology and processes that can be more or less amenable to DevOps implementation. That organizational culture is influenced by the personalities and management styles of Executive Management, the wider culture in which the organization is situated, and the personalities of key team members at all levels of the organization. This culture and entrenched interests usually throw a wrench in the work...
We all know that end users experience the internet primarily with mobile devices. From an app development perspective, we know that successfully responding to the needs of mobile customers depends on rapid DevOps – failing fast, in short, until the right solution evolves in your customers' relationship to your business. Whether you’re decomposing an SOA monolith, or developing a new application cloud natively, it’s not a question of using microservices - not doing so will be a path to eventual ...
The next XaaS is CICDaaS. Why? Because CICD saves developers a huge amount of time. CD is an especially great option for projects that require multiple and frequent contributions to be integrated. But… securing CICD best practices is an emerging, essential, yet little understood practice for DevOps teams and their Cloud Service Providers. The only way to get CICD to work in a highly secure environment takes collaboration, patience and persistence. Building CICD in the cloud requires rigorous ar...
"This all sounds great. But it's just not realistic." This is what a group of five senior IT executives told me during a workshop I held not long ago. We were working through an exercise on the organizational characteristics necessary to successfully execute a digital transformation, and the group was doing their ‘readout.' The executives loved everything we discussed and agreed that if such an environment existed, it would make transformation much easier. They just didn't believe it was reali...
Without lifecycle traceability and visibility across the tool chain, stakeholders from Planning-to-Ops have limited insight and answers to who, what, when, why and how across the DevOps lifecycle. This impacts the ability to deliver high quality software at the needed velocity to drive positive business outcomes. In his general session at @DevOpsSummit at 19th Cloud Expo, Eric Robertson, General Manager at CollabNet, will discuss how customers are able to achieve a level of transparency that e...
"DivvyCloud as a company set out to help customers automate solutions to the most common cloud problems," noted Jeremy Snyder, VP of Business Development at DivvyCloud, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 20th Cloud Expo, held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
We all know that end users experience the Internet primarily with mobile devices. From an app development perspective, we know that successfully responding to the needs of mobile customers depends on rapid DevOps – failing fast, in short, until the right solution evolves in your customers' relationship to your business. Whether you’re decomposing an SOA monolith, or developing a new application cloud natively, it’s not a question of using microservices – not doing so will be a path to eventual b...
"Opsani helps the enterprise adopt containers, help them move their infrastructure into this modern world of DevOps, accelerate the delivery of new features into production, and really get them going on the container path," explained Ross Schibler, CEO of Opsani, and Peter Nickolov, CTO of Opsani, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at DevOps Summit at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Docker is sweeping across startups and enterprises alike, changing the way we build and ship applications. It's the most prominent and widely known software container platform, and it's particularly useful for eliminating common challenges when collaborating on code (like the "it works on my machine" phenomenon that most devs know all too well). With Docker, you can run and manage apps side-by-side - in isolated containers - resulting in better compute density. It's something that many developer...
The “Digital Era” is forcing us to engage with new methods to build, operate and maintain applications. This transformation also implies an evolution to more and more intelligent applications to better engage with the customers, while creating significant market differentiators. In both cases, the cloud has become a key enabler to embrace this digital revolution. So, moving to the cloud is no longer the question; the new questions are HOW and WHEN. To make this equation even more complex, most ...
Your homes and cars can be automated and self-serviced. Why can't your storage? From simply asking questions to analyze and troubleshoot your infrastructure, to provisioning storage with snapshots, recovery and replication, your wildest sci-fi dream has come true. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 20th Cloud Expo, Dan Florea, Director of Product Management at Tintri, provided a ChatOps demo where you can talk to your storage and manage it from anywhere, through Slack and similar services with...
What's the role of an IT self-service portal when you get to continuous delivery and Infrastructure as Code? This general session showed how to create the continuous delivery culture and eight accelerators for leading the change. Don Demcsak is a DevOps and Cloud Native Modernization Principal for Dell EMC based out of New Jersey. He is a former, long time, Microsoft Most Valuable Professional, specializing in building and architecting Application Delivery Pipelines for hybrid legacy, and cloud ...
Many organizations are now looking to DevOps maturity models to gauge their DevOps adoption and compare their maturity to their peers. However, as enterprise organizations rush to adopt DevOps, moving past experimentation to embrace it at scale, they are in danger of falling into the trap that they have fallen into time and time again. Unfortunately, we've seen this movie before, and we know how it ends: badly.
"I focus on what we are calling CAST Highlight, which is our SaaS application portfolio analysis tool. It is an extremely lightweight tool that can integrate with pretty much any build process right now," explained Andrew Siegmund, Application Migration Specialist for CAST, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct 31 – Nov 2, 2017, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
"We view the cloud not as a specific technology but as a way of doing business and that way of doing business is transforming the way software, infrastructure and services are being delivered to business," explained Matthew Rosen, CEO and Director at Fusion, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo (http://www.CloudComputingExpo.com), held June 7-9 at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
You often hear the two titles of "DevOps" and "Immutable Infrastructure" used independently. In his session at DevOps Summit, John Willis, Technical Evangelist for Docker, covered the union between the two topics and why this is important. He provided an overview of Immutable Infrastructure then showed how an Immutable Continuous Delivery pipeline can be applied as a best practice for "DevOps." He ended the session with some interesting case study examples.
In his session at Cloud Expo, Alan Winters, U.S. Head of Business Development at MobiDev, presented a success story of an entrepreneur who has both suffered through and benefited from offshore development across multiple businesses: The smart choice, or how to select the right offshore development partner Warning signs, or how to minimize chances of making the wrong choice Collaboration, or how to establish the most effective work processes Budget control, or how to maximize project result...
Explosive growth in connected devices. Enormous amounts of data for collection and analysis. Critical use of data for split-second decision making and actionable information. All three are factors in making the Internet of Things a reality. Yet, any one factor would have an IT organization pondering its infrastructure strategy. How should your organization enhance its IT framework to enable an Internet of Things implementation? In his session at @ThingsExpo, James Kirkland, Red Hat's Chief Archi...