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Microservices Total Cost of Ownership: Too Soon? By @Aruna13 | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Docker #Containers #Microservices

Successfully executing on the microservices model will require more than just adding a new set of development disciplines

Microservices are hot. And for good reason. To compete in today's fast-moving application economy, it makes sense to break large, monolithic applications down into discrete functional units. Such an approach makes it easier to update and add functionalities (text-messaging a customer, calculating sales tax for a specific geography, etc.) and get those updates / adds into production fast. In fact, some would argue that microservices are a prerequisite for true continuous delivery.

But is it too soon to talk about keeping microservices lifecycle costs under control?

Thinking ahead
It is not too soon at all. In fact, history clearly tells us it's smart to think about microservices total cost of ownership (TCO) now. The introduction of PCs into the enterprise, for example, was extremely beneficial. Yet we soon discovered that it cost us more to operate distributed environments than we had anticipated. As a result, many organizations gave back a good piece of their economic gains as they struggled with TCO for years.

Server virtualization, too, has delivered substantial benefits by enabling us to make better use of hardware, respond more adaptively to demand, and streamline DR. But honest CIOs will admit that they were also blindsided by issues around administration, monitoring and sprawl.

The microservices model is likely to follow this same pattern. Yes, organizations will benefit significantly from microservices - especially in the containerization. However, realistic CIOs will recognize that it must cost IT something to own a large number of app services, rather than a relatively small number of monolithic applications.

These complexity-related costs will likely include:

  • Maintaining an up-to-date microservices catalog so that DevOps teams know exactly what is available to leverage-and who to contact with questions
  • Code promotion traffic that is an order of magnitude higher as releases into production multiply due to a large number of microservices being continuously updated
  • Extremely high-frequency test/QA activity to rigorously safeguard both the quality of each microservice and the multitude of "micro-calls" between microservices via multiple tests, including functional, performance/load and user acceptance testing
  • Safeguarding performance in production for a large number of discrete microservices - each of which have their own unique infrastructure dependencies
  • Securing and enforcing compliance for a large number of discrete microservices - each of which touch different data sets with different methods
  • Fragmentation of the people and teams that have to work together in order to keep the environment running smoothly and advancing at a good, fast clip

Successfully executing on the microservices model will require more than just adding a new set of development disciplines. It will also require rethinking - and perhaps even a retooling - of end-to-end DevOps management.

Incremental costs are non-trivial
There is, of course, a common tendency to stay in denial about complexity-related costs early in the hype-and-adoption process. That's because the gains look so attractive, and it can take a lot of work to achieve them. So IT leaders can be tempted to cross the complexity bridge when they come to it.

But I'd advise against that attitude. Microservices initiatives will get bogged down if they become too resource-intensive. And once you have inefficient practices in places, it's hard to displace them with more efficient ones.

If you're moving to microservices, give plenty of thought to how you can meet your new operational challenges effectively and efficiently. Because microservices is not just a dev technique. It's a whole new way of delivering value in the application economy.

More Stories By Aruna Ravichandran

Aruna Ravichandran has over 20 years of experience in building and marketing products in various markets such as IT Operations Management (APM, Infrastructure management, Service Management, Cloud Management, Analytics, Log Management, and Data Center Infrastructure Management), Continuous Delivery, Test Automation, Security and SDN. In her current role, she leads the product and solutions marketing, strategy, market segmentation, messaging, positioning, competitive and sales enablement across CA's DevOps portfolio.

Prior to CA, Aruna worked at Juniper Networks and Hewlett Packard where-in she led executive leadership roles in marketing and engineering.

Aruna is co-author of the book, "DevOps for Digital Leaders", which was published in 2016 and was named one of Top 100 The Most Influential Women in Silicon Valley by the San Jose Business Journal as well as 2016 Most Powerful and Influential Woman Award by the National Diversity Council.

Aruna holds a Masters in Computer Engineering and a MBA from Santa Clara University.

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