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Linux and Cloud Storage: a Story of Unrequited Love?

What Linux users can gain from cloud storage services

It is said that 95% of all supercomputers run Linux, so why do they still not get an invitation to the party? If you look at any cloud storage review, you will quickly notice that Linux users are often times left as an afterthought. Too many cloud service providers give Windows and Mac more than their share of the limelight despite the plethora of user-friendly capabilities of Linux. So, it can be asked, what do cloud storage providers have to offer Linux users?

Thankfully, a lot. There are three main ways you can regain glory with your Linux system. Firstly, connection. Linux users have the option to connect an online system to your Linux user interface. As all Linux users will know, the user interface is comprised of one of two things; either the command-line interface or the graphical user interface.  There are a plethora of graphical user-interfaces that can run with many if not all versions of Linux. These include: GNOME, KDE, Cinnamon, LXDE, MATE, Enlightenment, Pantheon, Trinity and Sugar. The most common of which are GNOME and KDE desktops. Additionally, these two desktops are more often than not supported by cloud storage providers.  Linux also offers its power users the option of a command line interface.

Secondly, a key component of Linux is that it is an open system. It is accessible from many other systems, and can even grant permissions for their own user-interface to be used instead. An example of this would be a client interface based on the open standard of WebDAV.

Consequently, it is not too much of a stretch of imagination to consider creating your own cloud storage client. Think about it, when you consider that Linux is continually making its code and interfaces freely available, the only question would be why not? Users who don’t want to use any of the current array of cloud storage -providers can even use the ‘rsync’ function to back up files to other devices. These could include Linux machines, web servers, and even Windows PC.

Linux system users might not experience the same glory as Windows or Mac as of yet, but this does not necessarily mean they are worse off for it. There is a significantly larger number of machines they can use for backup or for which they can store files and backups online.

More Stories By Natalie Lerner

Natalie Lerner is a senior contributor for CloudWedge. In her spare time, Natalie enjoys exploring all things cloud and is a music enthusiast. Follow Natalie’s daily posts on Twitter: @Cloudwedge, or on Facebook.