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Embracing Flash Storage: The New IT

Being an IT professional requires a variety of different skills & keeping your eye on the present while anticipating the future

It's common enough to be expected, but the IT world is continually undergoing all kinds of restructuring, remodeling and rethinking when it comes to approaching day-to-day tasks and challenges, both typical and atypical. A requirement of today's IT professional is to not only be fully acquainted with the current operating systems, software and processes, but also to be prepared for the big changes to come, as new updates, patches and strategies arrive. The arrival of cloud computing, BYOD and virtual desktops have led to many established standards being overthrown for these more beneficial and efficient ones.

The End of Spinning Disk Storage
For enterprise companies with massive storage needs, the solution in the past was to use disk-based resources, but those methods have become outdated with the arrival of all-flash strategies. Hard disk drive (HDD) storage requires a great deal of physical space, inevitably generates a lot of heat, consumes a lot of power, and can easily be damaged if any accidents or natural disasters were to happen. With speed being a priority, users are used to immediate communication and quick access to data with extremely short wait times, if any. When lined up side by side at the starting line, flash reaches the finish far ahead of its opponent, and this is one of the main reasons why HDD is being reconsidered as an ineffective choice for the needs of an enterprise business.

The Emergence of Flash
Flash's arrival has not been an overnight sensation. It's previously been so expensive that its weighty price tag scared off anyone who was thinking of implementing it. Now that it's becoming more reasonable, a flash array strategy is not only being considered by many large-scale companies, but its advantages are clear now that all-flash arrays are being given real-world usage in the health care, education, and finance industries, in addition to recommendations originating from major companies.

Speed, as already discussed, is a major characteristic that flash can provide, but dependable and consistent performance is also one of its benefits. When a team of employees needs to access information several times throughout the course of a day to make updates or view changes, an all-flash system is a wise choice.

Additionally, an all-flash implementation means that you'll be freeing up a great deal of physical space and reducing your energy consumption since racks of HDDs won't be in operation. The chances of server failure are also reduced as well as the drop in productivity that comes with those kinds of outages. The effect that flash will have on an IT department is that with fewer things to go wrong, IT won't deal with the difficulties of HDD storage and the maintenance it requires.

IT's Storage Evolution
Being an IT professional requires a variety of different skills and keeping your eye on the present while anticipating the future changes that will inevitably take place. Technology's speed and mobility is providing access from anywhere and making communication much easier, yet all this ease of use is also generating a tremendously increasing amount of data. For an enterprise, this means finding a cost-friendly and efficient means for data storage will be a top IT responsibility. Speed and performance are what any employee expects, and flash can provide an enterprise with a means for reaching greater productivity without the potential for problems due to disk failure or maintenance issues. With ongoing change a constant in the IT field, implementing a hybrid flash setup or an all-flash array solution can provide improvements in your storage strategies, but it can also weather many trends and changes, serving your company for years to come.

More Stories By Joseph Parker

Joseph Parker has worked in management, supply chain metrics, and business/marketing strategy with small and large businesses for more than 10 years. His experience in development is personal, stemming from his work in mobile marketing and application technology. He is an avid reader of industry publications and follows the ongoing technological trends stemming from software and product development. He is an inbound marketer, avid blogger, and content provider for many business blogs.