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Prologis Signs 715,000 Square Foot Build-To-Suit with Subaru of America

SAN FRANCISCO, April 10, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Prologis, Inc. (NYSE: PLD), the leading global owner, operator and developer of industrial real estate, today announced it has signed a new build-to-suit agreement with Subaru of America (SOA) for a 715,000 square foot distribution center. 

The new facility, which will support SOA's sales growth, will be located in the Northwest Indianapolis submarket at Prologis Park Lebanon, proximate to major freeways and the Indianapolis International Airport. The state-of-the-art, cross-dock facility will be utilized as a regional parts distribution center.

"We are pleased to support the ongoing success of Subaru," said Jim McGill, senior vice president, Prologis. "The record low supply of large industrial facilities continues to drive build-to-suit solutions in many markets around the country, including Indianapolis. With occupancies rising for the past two years, Indianapolis remains a compelling regional market."

Gary Palanjian, vice president of parts and service for SOA, said: "Subaru has been setting sales records for the past five years and we are structuring our operations to reflect that. This new facility allows us to better serve our retailers as well as support our growing operations at our manufacturing plant in Lafayette, Ind."

Within the Indianapolis market, Prologis owns and manages approximately 5.1 million square feet of logistics and distribution space.

About Prologis
Prologis, Inc. is the leading owner, operator and developer of industrial real estate, focused on global and regional markets across the Americas, Europe and Asia. As of Dec. 31, 2012, Prologis owned or had investments in, on a consolidated basis or through unconsolidated joint ventures, properties and development projects expected to total approximately 554 million square feet (51.5 million square meters) in 21 countries. The company leases modern distribution facilities to more than 4,500 customers, including manufacturers, retailers, transportation companies, third-party logistics providers and other enterprises.

The statements in this release that are not historical facts are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about the industry and markets in which Prologis operates, management's beliefs and assumptions made by management.  Such statements involve uncertainties that could significantly impact Prologis' financial results. Words such as "expects," "anticipates," "intends," "plans," "believes," "seeks," "estimates," variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements, which generally are not historical in nature.  All statements that address operating performance, events or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future — including statements relating to rent and occupancy growth, development activity and changes in sales or contribution volume of properties, disposition activity, general conditions in the geographic areas where we operate, our debt and financial position, our ability to form new co-investment ventures and the availability of capital in existing or new co-investment ventures — are forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Although we believe the expectations reflected in any forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, we can give no assurance that our expectations will be attained and therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or forecasted in such forward-looking statements. Some of the factors that may affect outcomes and results include, but are not limited to: (i) national, international, regional and local economic climates, (ii) changes in financial markets, interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates, (iii) increased or unanticipated competition for our properties, (iv) risks associated with acquisitions, dispositions and development of properties, (v) maintenance of real estate investment trust ("REIT") status and tax structuring, (vi) availability of financing and capital, the levels of debt that we maintain and our credit ratings, (vii) risks related to our investments in our co-investment ventures and funds, including our ability to establish new co-investment ventures and funds, (viii) risks of doing business internationally, including currency risks, (ix) environmental uncertainties, including risks of natural disasters, and (x) those additional factors discussed in reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission by Prologis under the heading "Risk Factors." Prologis undertakes no duty to update any forward-looking statements appearing in this release.

SOURCE Prologis, Inc.

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