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Toshiba Announces Cryptographic-Erase and Self-Encryption Features for New Enterprise SSD and Mobile HDD Models

The Storage Products Business Unit of Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc., a committed technology leader, announces new enterprise-grade SATA SSD models supporting cryptographic-erase and self-encrypting drive (SED) models, one an enterprise SAS solid state drive (eSSD) and the other a mobile SATA hard disk drive (HDD). Collectively, these four new 2.5-inch storage device models provide both IT system and PC system administrators with more effective tools to help secure sensitive business information.

Toshiba's MQ01ABU***W with new security features. (Photo: Business Wire)

Toshiba's MQ01ABU***W with new security features. (Photo: Business Wire)

For the enterprise, the PX02AMU value line of SATA eSSD models and PX03ANU read-intensive line of SATA SSD models feature cryptographic-erase. In addition, the PX02SMQ/U series offers Trusted Computing Group (TCG) enterprise protocol self-encryption and cryptographic-erase support in high-performance eSSD SAS models.

For mobile computing, the MQ01ABU***W series provides self-encryption, cryptographic-erase and TCG-Opal protocol support in a slim 7mm height with up to 500GB of storage capacity. The MQ01ABU***W series also supports Toshiba’s wipe technology, which allows systems designers to automatically cryptographic-erase data if an unexpected host attempts to access the HDDs or if a defined number of authentication failures occurs.

“According to Symantec,1 the average cost of an enterprise data breach is $5.5 million. System administrators can help to better secure sensitive data by using encrypted storage devices,” said Scott Wright, product manager, Toshiba Storage Products Business. “Toshiba’s latest eSSD and mobile HDD SED models provide the advanced security features companies need to properly sanitize SSDs in server and storage subsystems and ensure the security of private data on HDDs in mobile and desktop PCs to help prevent costly data breaches.”

With the continued adoption of cloud computing and data warehousing, companies face additional challenges in securing critical business information to meet compliance requirements. To help safeguard confidential data, these new Toshiba models use government-grade Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 256-bit self-encryption, and the PX02SMQ/U series SEDs support the TCG Enterprise Security Subsystem Class (SSC) protocols to provide additional security features.

Unlike a regular disk erase, which uses lengthy over-write operations, the Cryptographic-Erase function simply regenerates the SED drive’s encryption key, effectively invalidating all previously stored user data. This allows SED storage devices to be quickly and securely sanitized before re-allocation, redeployment or retirement.

  • The PX02AMU and PX03ANU are SATA MLC SSDs that provide transparent onboard hardware encryption to enable fast and secure cryptographic-erase using the industry-standard ATA Enhanced Secure Cryptographic Erase function. The PX02AMU has storage capacities of 100GB, 200GB and 400GB,2 and the PX02ANU includes 55GB, 120GB, 240GB and 480GB models. Both are suited for entry to mid-range server and storage systems, as well as read-intensive and boot devices for datacenter-optimized servers and scale-out storage systems.
  • The PX02SMQ/U series is an enterprise-class SAS MLC SSD with available storage capacities of 200GB, 400GB, 800GB and 1.6TB.3 Support of both SANITIZE Cryptographic-Erase and the TCG Enterprise SSC makes the PX02SMQ/U series suitable for management and protection of confidential data on mission-critical and business-critical server and storage systems.
  • The MQ01ABU***W series are 7mm high SATA 2.5-inch 5,400 RPM HDD SEDs with available storage capacities of 250GB, 320GB and 500GB. Support of both the ATA Enhanced Secure Cryptographic Erase function and the TCG-Opal SSC protocols makes the MQ01ABU series ideal for encrypting and protecting access to confidential data stored on mobile and desktop PCs protected by security management applications.

Sample shipments of the PX02AMU and PX03ANU SATA eSSD drives are scheduled for January 2013. In the first quarter of 2013, sample shipments are scheduled to begin for the PX02SMQ/U SAS eSSD SED drives and MQ01ABU***W series mobile SATA HDD SED.

Self-encryption and other security features are also available on select Toshiba enterprise-class 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch HDD models, as well as select 2.5-inch client SSD and HDD models. Toshiba is also working on FIPS 140-2 certification4 on select SED products to meet government-class security requirements.

For more information on Toshiba’s industry-leading enterprise-class and mobile-class SSDs and HDDs, visit www.toshibastorage.com. To connect with Toshiba Storage, visit the corporate blog at http://storage.toshiba.com/corporateblog and follow @ToshibaStorage on Twitter.

About Toshiba Storage Products

Toshiba Corporation and its affiliates offer one-of-a-kind global storage solutions, offering hard disk drives (HDDs), solid state drives (SSDs) and NAND flash memories — technologies that drive a wide range of consumer electronics, computer and automotive applications, as well as enterprise solutions for the global marketplace. Toshiba is a leader in the development, design and manufacture of mobile, consumer and enterprise hard disk drives and solid state drives. In North America, the Storage Products Business Unit of Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc., markets high-quality storage peripherals to original equipment manufacturers, original design manufacturers, value-added resellers, value-added dealers, systems integrators and distributors worldwide. Inherent in the Toshiba storage family are the high-quality engineering and manufacturing capabilities that have established Toshiba products as innovation leaders worldwide. For more information, visit www.toshibastorage.com.

About Toshiba Corp. and Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. (TAEC)

Through proven commitment, lasting relationships and advanced, reliable electronic components, Toshiba enables its customers to create market-leading designs. Toshiba is the heartbeat within product breakthroughs from OEMs, ODMs, CMs, VARs, distributors and fabless chip companies worldwide. A committed electronic components leader, Toshiba designs and manufactures high-quality flash memory-based storage solutions, solid state drives (SSDs), hard disk drives (HDDs), discrete devices, advanced materials, medical tubes, custom SoCs/ASICs, imaging products, microcontrollers and wireless components that make possible today’s leading smartphones, tablets, MP3 players, cameras, medical devices, automotive electronics, enterprise solutions and more.

Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. is an independent operating company owned by Toshiba America, Inc., a subsidiary of Toshiba Corporation, Japan’s largest semiconductor manufacturer and the world’s third largest semiconductor manufacturer (Gartner, 2011 Worldwide Semiconductor Revenue, March, 2012). Toshiba Corporation was founded in 1875 and today has over 490 subsidiaries and affiliates, with 203,000 employees worldwide. Visit Toshiba’s web site at www.toshiba.co.jp/index.htm.

© 2013 Toshiba America Electronic Components, Inc. All rights reserved. All product, service and company names are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of their respective owners. Information in this press release, including product pricing and specifications, content of services and contact information, is current and believed to be accurate on the date of the announcement, but is subject to change without prior notice. Technical and application information contained here is subject to the most recent applicable Toshiba product specifications.

1. Based on the March 2012 Ponemon Institute LLC study sponsored by Symantec, “2011 Cost of Data Breach Study: United States” http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/about/media/pdfs/b-ponemon-2011-cost-of-data-breach-us.en-us.pdf.

2. One Gigabyte (1GB) means 109 = 1,000,000,000 bytes using powers of 10. A computer operating system, however, reports storage capacity using powers of 2 for the definition of 1GB = 230 = 1,073,741,824 bytes and therefore shows less storage capacity. Available storage capacity (including examples of various media files) will vary based on file size, formatting, settings, software and operating system, such as Microsoft Operating System and/or pre-installed software applications, or media content. Actual formatted capacity may vary.

3. One Terabyte (1TB) means 1012= 1,000,000,000,000 bytes using powers of 10. A computer operating system, however, reports storage capacity using powers of 2 for the definition of 1TB = 240 = 1,099,511,627,776 bytes and therefore shows less storage capacity. Available storage capacity (including examples of various media files) will vary based on file size, formatting, settings, software and operating system, such as Microsoft Operating System and/or pre-installed software applications, or media content. Actual formatted capacity may vary.

4. FIPS 140-2, Federal Information Processing Standards 140-2 is a U.S. government computer security standard used to certify cryptographic modules.

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