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C++Builder Still Kicking

It’s supposed to offer a faster way to create high-performance native Windows 8 and Mac OS X PC and laptop applications

Embarcadero Technologies has just released a new 64-bit C++Builder solution - a linear descendent of Borland's C++ Builder created more than 15 years ago.

It's supposed to offer a faster way to create high-performance native Windows 8 and Mac OS X PC and laptop applications as well as Intel-based mobile apps from a single C++ codebase, helping developers clear the hurdle of building apps for multiple platforms without compromising on performance or user experience.

Given the recent diversification of client devices it'll get even more useful next year when it supports iOS (using Delphi) and then Android ARM mobile devices too. Later it'll move into cars and TVs.

The widgetry saves time and money.

C++ of course remains the leading development language across all operating systems. Most of the leading commercial client and server software today is written in C++, stuff like Google Chrome, Firefox, Mac OS X, iOS, Oracle database, SQL Server and MySQL. And Facebook, PayPal and Amazon also use it.

The new C++Builder XE3 implements a completely new multi-targeting native compiler architecture that generates applications that can utilize more memory and data and directly access 64-bit APIs, device drivers and system services.

The widgetry includes a full 64-bit compiler and VCL update for existing C++Builder customers who need to enable rapid 64-bit updates for millions of existing Windows apps.

Embarcadero claims the new 64-bit compiler architecture provides some of the best C++11 language standards and library compliance in the industry.

C++ developers can use Embarcadero standard C++ extensions to speed C++ development up to 5x faster than traditional development with agile techniques such as rapid prototyping, PME (properties/methods/events) component-based programming and visual development.

They can also use the Clang 3.1-compatible compiler with the latest C++ language features and libraries as well as integrate legacy source code to adhere to existing and newly released standards, including C++11.

It promises to build visually stunning applications with a Windows 8-style UI for the desktop across XP, Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8. It also says that its OS X and Retina Display support enables developers to create the best-looking Mac apps with native user experience and automatic HiDPI display support.

The starter kit costs a few hundred dollars, an enterprise license about $2,000.

More Stories By Maureen O'Gara

Maureen O'Gara the most read technology reporter for the past 20 years, is the Cloud Computing and Virtualization News Desk editor of SYS-CON Media. She is the publisher of famous "Billygrams" and the editor-in-chief of "Client/Server News" for more than a decade. One of the most respected technology reporters in the business, Maureen can be reached by email at maureen(at)sys-con.com or paperboy(at)g2news.com, and by phone at 516 759-7025. Twitter: @MaureenOGara

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