Welcome!

Microservices Expo Authors: Carmen Gonzalez, Kalyan Ramanathan, Liz McMillan, Sematext Blog, Elizabeth White

Blog Feed Post

How to: Use the SharePoint 2013 REST API from a Windows Store App (Windows 8 Metro)

I’ve recently taken an interest to building Windows Store Apps (aka Windows 8 Metro).  Not because I think I can get rich in the Windows Store but because I think it provides a unique way to present SharePoint data.  If you’re like me, you probably assumed Windows Store App development was just like .NET Framework 4.5 development.  You would be wrong.  The .NET Framework is provided by a single assembly reference called .NET for Windows Store Apps.  It has many of the familiar classes that you have come to expect.  My initial thinking was that I could use the SharePoint Client Object Model directly from my app.  That thinking was also wrong.  It turns out that the Client Object Model has a dependency on System.Web.Service.dll which does not exist in .NET for Windows Store Apps.  Simply put, Window Store Apps only support WCF references.  This means that the REST API is now our best choice.

When it comes to Windows Store Apps, you have a few choices on which programming language to use.  Modern JavaScript is not my strong point, so I am going to demonstrate using C#.  Before we dig into the C# code though, we’ll take a look at how to construct the REST URL.  This article on MSDN does a great job explaining the details of how the URL is built.  Essentially we start with the URL to our site (i.e.: http://server/site) and append /_api/web/lists to it along with a method to get a particular list by title, getbytitle.  To get the items of the list we append /items to it.   In my case, I want to pull the tasks list of a site so it would look something like this.

http://server/site/_api/web/list/getbytitle(‘tasks’)/items

You can type this right into your browser and see the XML that the REST API returns.  Here’s an example.

RESTAPIListsBrowser

There is a lot of XML to take in there.  We’re particularly interested in the content element contain in each entry element.  This has the data from our list items.  However, we can reduce the amount of XML returned significantly by using the $select parameter on the REST URL.  In my case I am going to select a few common fields such as Title, DueDate, and Status.  Here is what the URL looks like now.

http://server/site/_api/web/list/getbytitle(‘tasks’)/items?$select=Title,DueDate,Status,PercentComplete

RESTAPIListsWithSelectBrowser

You’ll notice that the results are much more manageable now.  We’ll talk about how we can use LINQ to XML here shortly to parse this data into something usable from our Windows Store app. 

Now let’s look at the code that is required to get the data in our app.  Start by creating a new Windows Store App in Visual Studio 2012.  You can do this by choosing your language (C#) and then Windows Store –> Blank App (XAML).

VS12NewWindowsStoreApp

If this is the first Windows Store App you have started in Visual Studio, you will be prompted for your Windows Live credentials.  This allows you to get a certificate so that you can build apps locally.  In our app, we want to bind data, so I am going to create a new Items Page.  This template has many of the components you need to get started quickly with data binding.

VS12NewItemsPage

When adding the page, you will be prompted to add some dependent files.  Click yes and then you should see your design surface.  Now, open the code-behind of your Items page.  In the LoadState method, we will start the process of retrieving our data and binding it.  We rely on some asynchronous calls to get data from REST, so we will need to put this data in another method and use the async keyword.

protected override void LoadState(Object navigationParameter, Dictionary<String, Object> pageState)

{

    // TODO: Assign a bindable collection of items to this.DefaultViewModel["Items"]

    BindData();

}

 

private async void BindData()

{

 

}

Before we start writing the method though, we need to include a few using statements.

using System.Net;

using System.Net.Http;

using System.Xml;

using System.Xml.Linq;

If you have looked at any of the other C# examples for working with the REST API, you will know they are heavily dependent on the HttpWebRequest object.  However, with Windows Store Apps, we have to use HttpClient instead. We’ll start by defining our REST URL from up above.

string restUrl = "http://server/_api/lists/getbytitle('tasks')/items?$select=Title,DueDate,Body,Status,PercentComplete";

To handle authentication we first need to create an HttpClientHandler object.  We want to automatically use the credentials of the currently logged in user so this is required.  To enable this, just set UseDefaultCredentials to true.  There are also other settings required which we’ll talk about below.

HttpClientHandler httpClientHandler = new HttpClientHandler();

httpClientHandler.UseDefaultCredentials = true;

We can now create the HttpClient object by passing the HttpClientHandler to the constructor.

HttpClient client = new HttpClient(httpClientHandler);

We then need to tell the REST API, that we want the result back as ATOM / XML as opposed to JSON.  We do this by setting a few headers.

client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("Accept", "application/atom+xml");

client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("ContentType", "application/atom+xml;type=entry");

Now, we can send the request to SharePoint and wait for a response.  We use the await keyword on the GetAsync() method which is why we needed the async keyword on the method signature.  The EnsureSuccessStatusCode() method simply throws an exception if a valid 200 HTTP response is not received.

var response = await client.GetAsync(restUrl);

response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();

At this point our data has been received back at the client from SharePoint.  Now we need to begin the fun process of parsing it and binding it.  We get the raw string XML data with the following method (also asynchronous).  You could run the app at this point (with a few tweaks) if you wanted to see it in the debugger but we haven’t done anything wit the data yet.

string

responseBody = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();

Now we need to read the XML into an XDocument object so that we can use LINQ to XML to parse it.

StringReader reader = new StringReader(responseBody);

XDocument responseXml = XDocument.Load(reader, LoadOptions.None);

Now we have the data into something queryable.  However, what we really need is a custom object that we can bind to.  If you look back at the XML, you might have noticed a few namespaces in use in the XML document.  We need to define those or our queries will never work.

XNamespace atom = "http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom";

XNamespace d = "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ado/2007/08/dataservices";

XNamespace m = "http://schemas.microsoft.com/ado/2007/08/dataservices/metadata";

Now, we can use LINQ to XML to select the data into a new anonymous type.  If you look at the XML again, we want to query entry elements using the Descendants() method and then the actual values we want are inside the nested Content and then Properties elements.  The data is heavily nested so it makes our LINQ to XML a little messy.  It’s not too bad though.  For the non-string values, I parse the data into the type that I want it (i.e.: DateTime).

var items = from item in responseXml.Descendants(atom + "entry")

            select new

            {

                Title = item.Element(atom + "content").Element(m + "properties").Element(d + "Title").Value,

                DueDate = DateTime.Parse(item.Element(atom + "content").Element(m + "properties").Element(d + "DueDate").Value),

                Status = item.Element(atom + "content").Element(m + "properties").Element(d + "Status").Value,

                PercentComplete = decimal.Parse(item.Element(atom + "content").Element(m + "properties").Element(d + "PercentComplete").Value)

            };

Now, we have data that can be bound to the GridView / ListView on the Items Page.  To bind we assign our data source as follows:

this

.DefaultViewModel["Items"] = items;

Just like Windows Phone and SharePoint apps need to declare the capabilities of the application, Windows Store Apps are no different.  To do this, open Package.appmanifest.  In our case, we need to declare that we intend to communicate over the internal network (Private Networks) and that we need Enterprise Authentication.  The latter allows the app to authenticate with the current user’s domain credentials automatically.  If you don’t have this capability set, you are guaranteed a 401 Access Denied or Unable to connect to remote server error.

Windows8ProjectCapabilities

We can now run the app.  However, there is one last thing we need to do.  We need a way to navigate to the TaskItemsPage that we created.  It loads MainPage by default.  Without getting to deep into how Windows Store app navigation works, we’ll just throw a button on the MainPage and then navigate to the TaskItemsPage when clicked.  You can drag and drop a button onto the MainPage using the designer.  Double click on it and it will create the event handling method.  Then we use Frame.Navigate() and pass it the type of page we want to go to, TaskItemsPage.  Here is the code.

private void Button_Click_1(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)

{

    Frame.Navigate(typeof(TasksItemsPage));

}

Run your app, and click on the button to navigate to your TaskItemsPage.  If all goes well, you won’t receive any errors and you’ll see a page like the screen below.  Note, that your application doesn’t currently have any way to exit.  To get out you either need to Alt+Tab or move your mouse to the Top-Left corner of the screen to switch to the desktop.

Windows8TasksItemsPage

This is great, but we’re not using all of our data yet.  By default, it will bind the Title for us.  However, we want to display some of our additional fields though.  To do this, we can create a DataTemplate.  We need to look into how it works first though.  Locate the GridView in your XAML file.  It should look something like this.

<GridView

    x:Name="itemGridView"

    AutomationProperties.AutomationId="ItemsGridView"

    AutomationProperties.Name="Items"

    TabIndex="1"

    Grid.RowSpan="2"

    Padding="116,136,116,46"

    ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource itemsViewSource}}"

    ItemTemplate="{StaticResource Standard250x250ItemTemplate}"

    SelectionMode="None"

    IsSwipeEnabled="false"/>

Notice the ItemTemplate and how it is bound to Standard250x250ItemTemplate.  This template can actually be found in StandardStyles.xaml

<DataTemplate x:Key="Standard250x250ItemTemplate">

    <Grid HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="250" Height="250">

        <Border Background="{StaticResource ListViewItemPlaceholderBackgroundThemeBrush}">

            <Image Source="{Binding Image}" Stretch="UniformToFill" AutomationProperties.Name="{Binding Title}"/>

        </Border>

        <StackPanel VerticalAlignment="Bottom" Background="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlayBackgroundThemeBrush}">

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Title}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlayForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource TitleTextStyle}" Height="60" Margin="15,0,15,0"/>

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Subtitle}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlaySecondaryForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource CaptionTextStyle}" TextWrapping="NoWrap" Margin="15,0,15,10"/>

        </StackPanel>

    </Grid>

</DataTemplate>

If you look at what it is binding, it’s looking for fields Image, Title, and Subtitle.  We don’t have an image, so we can get rid of that.  In its place, we’ll add the other fields in our dataset.  We don’t want to edit the out-of-the-box template, so we can copy this snippet and add it to the Pages.Resources element in our TaskItemsPage.xaml.  I then changed its name to TaskItemTemplate and added the remaining fields.

<DataTemplate x:Key="TaskItemTemplate">

    <Grid HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="250" Height="250">

        <StackPanel VerticalAlignment="Top" Background="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlayBackgroundThemeBrush}">

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Title}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlayForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource TitleTextStyle}" Height="60" Margin="15,0,15,0"/>

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding DueDate}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlaySecondaryForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource CaptionTextStyle}" TextWrapping="NoWrap" Margin="15,0,15,10"/>

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding PercentComplete}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlaySecondaryForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource CaptionTextStyle}" TextWrapping="NoWrap" Margin="15,0,15,10"/>

            <TextBlock Text="{Binding Status}" Foreground="{StaticResource ListViewItemOverlaySecondaryForegroundThemeBrush}" Style="{StaticResource CaptionTextStyle}" TextWrapping="NoWrap" Margin="15,0,15,10"/>

        </StackPanel>

    </Grid>

</DataTemplate>

Now we just need to change the template name in the GridView to use the TaskItemTemplate.

<GridView

    x:Name="itemGridView"

    AutomationProperties.AutomationId="ItemsGridView"

    AutomationProperties.Name="Items"

    TabIndex="1"

    Grid.RowSpan="2"

    Padding="116,136,116,46"

    ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource itemsViewSource}}"

    ItemTemplate="{StaticResource TaskItemTemplate}"

    SelectionMode="None"

    IsSwipeEnabled="false"/>

Run the app again and you’ll now have your custom fields bound.  It should look something like this.

Windows8TasksItemsPageCustomTemplate

The DueDate and PercentComplete are not formatted in this case.  I won’t cover that today, but if you look at the Blog Reader example, it explains the techniques you can use to do cool formatting.  The Data Binding article goes into a lot of detail if you want to learn all of the ways you can bind data too.  If you want a good tutorial to start from scratch on a Windows Store App, see the Hello, World example.

This turned out to be quite the long blog post.  I hope you find it useful.  If you find this interesting and you are going to be at SharePoint Conference 2012 in November (SPC12), you should be sure and attend my session Bringing SharePoint to the Desktop: Building Windows Store Apps with SharePoint 2013 (SPC025).

Follow me on twitter @coreyroth.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Corey Roth

Corey Roth, a SharePoint Server MVP, is a consultant at Hitachi Consulting specializing in SharePoint and Office 365 for clients in the energy sector. He has more than ten years of experience delivering solutions in the energy, travel, advertising and consumer electronics verticals.

Corey specializes in delivering ECM and search solutions to clients using SharePoint. Corey has always focused on rapid adoption of new Microsoft technologies including Visual Studio 2013, Office 365, and SharePoint.

He is a member of the .NET Mafia (www.dotnetmafia.com) where he blogs about the latest technology and SharePoint. He is dedicated to the community and speaks regularly at user groups and SharePoint Saturdays.

@MicroservicesExpo Stories
@DevOpsSummit taking place June 6-8, 2017 at Javits Center, New York City, is co-located with the 20th International Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. @DevOpsSummit at Cloud Expo New York Call for Papers is now open.
Logs are continuous digital records of events generated by all components of your software stack – and they’re everywhere – your networks, servers, applications, containers and cloud infrastructure just to name a few. The data logs provide are like an X-ray for your IT infrastructure. Without logs, this lack of visibility creates operational challenges for managing modern applications that drive today’s digital businesses.
Today we can collect lots and lots of performance data. We build beautiful dashboards and even have fancy query languages to access and transform the data. Still performance data is a secret language only a couple of people understand. The more business becomes digital the more stakeholders are interested in this data including how it relates to business. Some of these people have never used a monitoring tool before. They have a question on their mind like “How is my application doing” but no id...
In IT, we sometimes coin terms for things before we know exactly what they are and how they’ll be used. The resulting terms may capture a common set of aspirations and goals – as “cloud” did broadly for on-demand, self-service, and flexible computing. But such a term can also lump together diverse and even competing practices, technologies, and priorities to the point where important distinctions are glossed over and lost.
Monitoring of Docker environments is challenging. Why? Because each container typically runs a single process, has its own environment, utilizes virtual networks, or has various methods of managing storage. Traditional monitoring solutions take metrics from each server and applications they run. These servers and applications running on them are typically very static, with very long uptimes. Docker deployments are different: a set of containers may run many applications, all sharing the resource...
Without lifecycle traceability and visibility across the tool chain, stakeholders from Planning-to-Ops have limited insight and answers to who, what, when, why and how across the DevOps lifecycle. This impacts the ability to deliver high quality software at the needed velocity to drive positive business outcomes. In his session at @DevOpsSummit 19th Cloud Expo, Eric Robertson, General Manager at CollabNet, showed how customers are able to achieve a level of transparency that enables everyone fro...
Information technology is an industry that has always experienced change, and the dramatic change sweeping across the industry today could not be truthfully described as the first time we've seen such widespread change impacting customer investments. However, the rate of the change, and the potential outcomes from today's digital transformation has the distinct potential to separate the industry into two camps: Organizations that see the change coming, embrace it, and successful leverage it; and...
Join Impiger for their featured webinar: ‘Cloud Computing: A Roadmap to Modern Software Delivery’ on November 10, 2016, at 12:00 pm CST. Very few companies have not experienced some impact to their IT delivery due to the evolution of cloud computing. This webinar is not about deciding whether you should entertain moving some or all of your IT to the cloud, but rather, a detailed look under the hood to help IT professionals understand how cloud adoption has evolved and what trends will impact th...
Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place June 6-8, 2017 at the Javits Center in New York City, New York, is co-located with the 20th International Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. @ThingsExpo New York Call for Papers is now open.
The 20th International Cloud Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. Cloud Expo, to be held June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, brings together Cloud Computing, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, Containers, Microservices and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding business opportunity. Submit your speaking proposal ...
You have great SaaS business app ideas. You want to turn your idea quickly into a functional and engaging proof of concept. You need to be able to modify it to meet customers' needs, and you need to deliver a complete and secure SaaS application. How could you achieve all the above and yet avoid unforeseen IT requirements that add unnecessary cost and complexity? You also want your app to be responsive in any device at any time. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Allen, General Manager of...
Keeping pace with advancements in software delivery processes and tooling is taxing even for the most proficient organizations. Point tools, platforms, open source and the increasing adoption of private and public cloud services requires strong engineering rigor – all in the face of developer demands to use the tools of choice. As Agile has settled in as a mainstream practice, now DevOps has emerged as the next wave to improve software delivery speed and output. To make DevOps work, organization...
"Dice has been around for the last 20 years. We have been helping tech professionals find new jobs and career opportunities," explained Manish Dixit, VP of Product and Engineering at Dice, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 19th Cloud Expo, held November 1-3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA.
Rapid innovation, changing business landscapes, and new IT demands force businesses to make changes quickly. In the eyes of many, containers are at the brink of becoming a pervasive technology in enterprise IT to accelerate application delivery. In this presentation, attendees learned about the: The transformation of IT to a DevOps, microservices, and container-based architecture What are containers and how DevOps practices can operate in a container-based environment A demonstration of how ...
More and more companies are looking to microservices as an architectural pattern for breaking apart applications into more manageable pieces so that agile teams can deliver new features quicker and more effectively. What this pattern has done more than anything to date is spark organizational transformations, setting the foundation for future application development. In practice, however, there are a number of considerations to make that go beyond simply “build, ship, and run,” which changes how...
Without lifecycle traceability and visibility across the tool chain, stakeholders from Planning-to-Ops have limited insight and answers to who, what, when, why and how across the DevOps lifecycle. This impacts the ability to deliver high quality software at the needed velocity to drive positive business outcomes. In his general session at @DevOpsSummit at 19th Cloud Expo, Phil Hombledal, Solution Architect at CollabNet, discussed how customers are able to achieve a level of transparency that e...
Between 2005 and 2020, data volumes will grow by a factor of 300 – enough data to stack CDs from the earth to the moon 162 times. This has come to be known as the ‘big data’ phenomenon. Unfortunately, traditional approaches to handling, storing and analyzing data aren’t adequate at this scale: they’re too costly, slow and physically cumbersome to keep up. Fortunately, in response a new breed of technology has emerged that is cheaper, faster and more scalable. Yet, in meeting these new needs they...
In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Claude Remillard, Principal Program Manager in Developer Division at Microsoft, contrasted how his team used config as code and immutable patterns for continuous delivery of microservices and apps to the cloud. He showed how the immutable patterns helps developers do away with most of the complexity of config as code-enabling scenarios such as rollback, zero downtime upgrades with far greater simplicity. He also demoed building immutable pipelines in the cloud ...
Application transformation and DevOps practices are two sides of the same coin. Enterprises that want to capture value faster, need to deliver value faster – time value of money principle. To do that enterprises need to build cloud-native apps as microservices by empowering teams to build, ship, and run in production. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 19th Cloud Expo, Neil Gehani, senior product manager at HPE, discussed what every business should plan for how to structure their teams to delive...
As we enter the final week before the 19th International Cloud Expo | @ThingsExpo in Santa Clara, CA, it's time for me to reflect on six big topics that will be important during the show. Hybrid Cloud This general-purpose term seems to provide a comfort zone for many enterprise IT managers. It sounds reassuring to be able to work with one of the major public-cloud providers like AWS or Microsoft Azure while still maintaining an on-site presence.