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Tyler Technologies Wins $1.6 Million Multi-Solution Contract

Moore County has contracted for several of Tyler's Munis revenue applications including NC Tax and Motor Vehicle Billing

Tyler Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: TYL) has reached an agreement with Moore County, North Carolina, for the purchase of Tyler's Munis and iasWorld software. This multi-solution contract is valued at approximately $1.6 million.

Moore County has contracted for several of Tyler's Munis revenue applications, including North Carolina Tax and Motor Vehicle Billing. Additionally, it has selected the Web-based Citizen Self Service application, which provides citizens with the capability to pay tax bills online. For assessment software, the County has chosen Tyler's iasWorld solution, a fully integrated system that includes CAMA (computer aided mass appraisal), assessment administration, and inquiry & appeals tracking.

“This new software system will eliminate many manual processes, and some very outdated systems in our County, leapfrogging us into a fully automated set of processes that link and integrate multiple departments,” commented Moore County Manager Cary McSwain. “This will enable us to become more effective, efficient, accessible, and responsive both internally and externally as we address the needs of citizens in our daily functions. The County is very excited about this new venture with Tyler and looks forward to its full implementation in the next 24-36 months.” McSwain added that Tyler’s experience in the public sector, along with its strong customer base in North Carolina, were key factors in the County’s choice of Tyler.

"With this contract Tyler continues a long-standing track record of providing its industry-leading solutions in North Carolina,” said John S. Marr, Jr., president and CEO of Tyler Technologies. “These solutions offer the ideal combination to meet Moore County's specific tax collection and assessment needs. The fact that Tyler meets the County's requirements as a single-source provider is further evidence of our reputation for providing the systems that local government entities seek to better serve the public," he added.

Moore County, formed in 1784, was named for Alfred Moore, an officer in the American Revolutionary War and associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. The County is known mainly for prestigious golf resorts in the Southern Pines/Pinehurst area, and played host to the 1999 and 2005 Men's U.S. Opens. Many celebrities frequent the area or own private homes, including Michael Jordan, Tiger Woods, Jack Nicklaus, and Sean Connery. The County’s population is approximately 85,600 and the county seat is in Carthage.

Based in Dallas, Tyler Technologies is a leading provider of end-to-end information management solutions and services for local governments. Tyler partners with clients to enable the public sector–cities, counties, schools and other government entities–to become more efficient, more accessible, and more responsive to the needs of citizens. Tyler’s client base includes more than 8,000 local government offices throughout all 50 states, Canada, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom. Tyler has been named one of “America’s 200 Best Small Companies” for three consecutive years by Forbes Magazine. More information about Tyler Technologies can be found at www.tylertech.com.

This document may contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 that are not historical in nature and typically address future or anticipated events, trends, expectations or beliefs with respect to our financial condition, results of operations or business. Forward-looking statements often contain words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “foresees,” “forecasts,” “estimates,” “plans,” “intends,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “projects,” “might,” “could” or other similar words or phrases. Similarly, statements that describe our business strategy, outlook, objectives, plans, intentions or goals also are forward-looking statements. We believe there is a reasonable basis for our forward-looking statements, but they are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties and actual results could differ materially from the expectations and beliefs reflected in the forward-looking statements. We presently consider the following to be among the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations and beliefs: (1) economic, political and market conditions, including the recent global economic and financial crisis, and the general tightening of access to debt or equity capital; (2) our ability to achieve our financial forecasts due to various factors, including project delays by our customers, reductions in transaction size, fewer transactions, delays in delivery of new products or releases or a decline in our renewal rates for service agreements; (3) changes in the budgets or regulatory environments of our customers, primarily local and state governments, that could negatively impact information technology spending; (4) technological and market risks associated with the development of new products or services or of new versions of existing or acquired products or services; (5) our ability to successfully complete acquisitions and achieve growth or operational synergies through the integration of acquired businesses, while avoiding unanticipated costs and disruptions to existing operations; (6) competition in the industry in which we conduct business and the impact of competition on pricing, customer retention and pressure for new products or services; (7) the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel and dealing with the loss or retirement of key members of management or other key personnel; and (8) costs of compliance and any failure to comply with government and stock exchange regulations. A detailed discussion of these factors and other risks that affect our business are described in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the detailed “Risk Factors” contained in our most recent annual report on Form 10-K. We expressly disclaim any obligation to publicly update or revise our forward-looking statements.

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