Click here to close now.

Welcome!

Microservices Journal Authors: Ruxit Blog, Jayaram Krishnaswamy, Yeshim Deniz, Alena Prokharchyk, Pat Romanski

Related Topics: Microservices Journal

Microservices Journal: Article

Five Reasons Why Web 2.0 Matters

The fact is that the general public is still struggling with blogs and wikis, much less full blown architectures


I've been spending a lot of time lately with folks around the mid-Atlantic region and talking to them about Web 2.0.  I get the expected full spectrum of responses ranging from genuine interest and active enthusiasm to some outright hostility.  Part of it is where the Web 2.0 space is still: an elite niche of technologists with a growing wider awareness that's just beginning.

Most of us know that the technology industry and the Web are often far out ahead of the mainstream.  The fact is that the general public is still struggling with blogs and wikis, much less full blown architectures of participation and software as a service (to name just two aspects of Web 2.0).  Not sure about this?  Try sampling a few people at random and ask them what a blog is.  You will probably be surprised with the answers.  Nevertheless, I'm extremely sanguine about Web 2.0 and where it's headed (notwithstanding Bubble 2.0 type events like the RSS Fund assembling a massive $100 million warchest and using it with questionable judgement.)

While generally exciting and engaging by most accounts, one thing my public presentations on Web 2.0 don't seem to address is the value proposition to the average person or organization.  Why should they spend their valuable time to leverage Web 2.0 ideas, participate in Web 2.0 software, or even create new Web 2.0 functionality?
How exactly does taking the effort to do this become worthwhile?  That question doesn't seem to be asked often enough or generally articulated.  Web 2.0 is exciting enough in its own right to sustain lots of interest and buzz, but how does it translate to delivering tangible value to the world at large?

To address this, I've thought fairly long and hard, and come up with a starting point at least.  I've tried to create the most distilled, direct explanation of the benefits that Web 2.0 best practices can provide in using and building engaging, useful software on the Web. 


Five Reasons Why Web 2.0 Matters


  1. The Focus of Technology Moves To People With Web 2.0.  One of the lessons the software industry relearns every generation is that it's always a people problem.  It's not that people are the actual problem of course.  It's when software developers naively use technology to try to solve our problems instead of addressing the underlying issues that people are actually facing.  Then the wrong things inevitably happen;  we've all seen technology for its own sake or views of the world which are focused much too little on where people fit into the picture. Put another way, people and their needs have to be at the center of any vision of software because technology is only here to make our lives and businesses better, easier, faster or whatever else we require.  Web 2.0 ideas have been successful (at least) because they effectively put people back into the technological equation.  This even goes as far as turning it on its head entirely and making the technology about people.  Web 2.0 fundamentally revolves around us and seeks to ensure that we engage ourselves, participate and collaborate together, and mutually trust and enrich each other, even though we could be separated by the entire world geographically.  And Web 2.0 gives us very specific techniques to do this and attempts to address the "people problem" directly.
  2. Web 2.0 Represents Best Practices.  The ideas in the Web 2.0 toolbox were not pulled from thin air.  In fact, they were systematically identified by what actually worked during the first generation of the Web.  Web 2.0 contains proven techniques for building valuable Web-based software and experiences.  The original Design Patterns book was one of the most popular books of its time because it at long last represented distilled knowledge of how to design software with ideas couched in a form that were reusable and accessible.  So too are the Web 2.0 best practices.  If you want to make software deliver the very best content and functionality to its users, Web 2.0 is an ideal place to start.
  3. Web 2.0 Has Excellent Feng Shui.  Yes, I'll get in trouble for stating it this way but I think it fits, here goes...  I'm a technologist by background and I don't buy into the new-agey vision of Web 2.0 that has sometimes been promulgated.  And I certainly don't believe that Web 2.0 has a "morality" as the famous Tim O'Reilly/Nicholas Carr debate highlighted.  However, as someone that has designed and built lots of software for two decades now, I have plenty of regard for the way the pieces of Web 2.0 fit together snugly and mutually reinforce each other.  Why does this matter?  It has to do with critical mass and synergy, two vital value creation forces.  Taken individually, Web 2.0 techniques like harnessing collective intelligence, radical decentralization, The Long Tail are quite powerful, but they all have a potency much greater than their simple sum and they strongly reinforce each other.  In fact, I'll go as far as to say that only "doing" parts of Web 2.0 can get you into some real trouble. You need a core set of Web 2.0 techniques in order to be successful and then the value curve goes geometric.  This is why the ROI of software built this way is so much greater.  Here's an earlier post that provides more detailed examples of why this is.
  4. Quality Is Maximized, Waste Is Minimized.  The software world is going through one of its cyclical crises as development jobs go overseas and older, more bloated ways of building software finish imploding as the latest software techniques become more agile and lightweight (sometimes called lean).  The guys over at 37Signals say it best...  Using Web 2.0 you can build better software with less people, less money, less abstractions, less effort, and with this increase in constraints you get cleaner, more satisfying software as the result.  And simpler software is invariably higher quality.
  5. Web 2.0 Has A Ballistic TrajectoryNever count out the momentum of a rapidly emerging idea.  For example, I'm a huge fan of Eric Evans' Domain Driven Design but it's so obscure that it will probably never get off the ground in a big way. There's no buzz, excitement, or even a general marketplace for it.  This is Web 2.0's time in the sun, deserved or not.  You can use the leviathan forces of attention and enthusiasm that are swirling around Web 2.0 these days as a powerful enabler to make something important and exciting happen in your organization.  Use this opportunity to seize the initiative, ride the wave, and build great software that matters.
Certainly there are other reasons why Web 2.0 is important and you're welcome to list them here, but I think this captures the central vision in a way that most anyone who is Web literate can grasp and access.

BTW, I will also use this moment to state that Web 2.0 is a terrible name for this new vision of Web-based people-centric software.  Except that is for every other name we have at the moment (for example, like "next generation of the Web").  So I will continue to use Web 2.0 until something better comes along.

OK, don't agree?  Please straighten me out.  Why does Web 2.0 matter (or not) to you?

Technorati: web2.0

More Stories By RIA News Desk

Ever since Google popularized a smarter, more responsive and interactive Web experience by using AJAX (Asynchronous JavaScript + XML) for its Google Maps & Gmail applications, SYS-CON's RIA News Desk has been covering every aspect of Rich Internet Applications and those creating and deploying them. If you have breaking RIA news, please send it to [email protected] to share your product and company news coverage with AJAXWorld readers.

Comments (13) View Comments

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


Most Recent Comments
jabailo 05/14/09 01:35:00 PM EDT

This is a time of innovation, not definition.

SOA, Web 2.0 -- these are "attempts" to categorize things...things which are new and barely known.

I chafe at the bit when some bombastic know-it-all tells me about a buzzword that is going to be the ne plus ultra of it all.

In fact, these very terms, Web 2.0 and SOA -- are about "divergent" technologies, that allow for ever expanding technology types!

web2.wsj2.com 03/27/06 01:21:37 AM EST

Trackback Added: The Web 2.0 Trinity: People, Data, and Great Software; I've still been absorbing all the terrific brainstorming that came out of SPARK last weekend. One of the key bits that was agreed upon by all almost immediately was the utter centrality of the user. I've been big believe of this since ear

web2.wsj2.com 03/26/06 10:51:42 PM EST

Trackback Added: The Web 2.0 Trinity: People, Data, and Great Software; I've still been absorbing all the terrific brainstorming that came out of SPARK last weekend. One of the key bits that was agreed upon by all almost immediately was the utter centrality of the user. I've been big believe of this since ear

bluestrain 12/10/05 10:46:24 AM EST

I sense a bit of hostility. Tough room. It's like watching Java programmer do comedy at a sysadmin convention.

mustafap 12/10/05 10:43:56 AM EST

In the good old days, the techincal people designed the web, and they built it.
Now, it will probably be the marketing and commercial people who will drive the design of the next generation 'web'.

The thing that worries me is that the people who write viruses, worms, spyware etc are *so* much more technically savy than the kind of people who are going to drive the next generation systems. Those guys & girls are going to have a field day.

lmlloyd 12/10/05 07:10:30 AM EST

Oh, I had really hoped that the one upside of the bubble bursting would be that people would finally see the leveraged synergistics of empowered, paradigm-shifting, buzzword groupthink, as the load of con-man fast talk it really is.

My rectum gets all in a bunch at the very concept that these out-of-the-box, emergent asshats will be once again squaring off for the mindshare of our collective intelligence, so that they can capture eyeballs to secure a solid ROI in their VC funding!

You know, you would think that after losing tons of money in the last dotcom bust, people would figure out that if you have to make up words to describe your idea, it probably isn't a very good one. It is funny to me how the most successful businesses out of the last buzzword feeding frenzy had descriptions like "You use it to find information" or "it is an auction, on the computer" or "you pay to see nude women, on the computer" or "you buy things, and they are shipped to you."

But no, now we have Web 2.0, and all the English mangling, linguistically garbage spewing, criminal bottom feeders who missed out on their last chance to bilk investors out of millions of dollars, will have another shot at it! And all the rest of us will have to hear all over again how we just "don't get it" because we lack the vision to see the future. Oh joy!

drwho 12/10/05 07:08:53 AM EST

Yes my heads starts to spin when I read this stuff. My bullshit detectors go off too. But if someone with bags of money decides to start a dotcom 2.0 company in San Francisco and pay me $120,000 per year to go slap together a few applications, I'll pretend I believe.

I feel like I am reading Wired or Mondo 2000 circa 1997 when I read about Web 2.0.

Honestly, though, what novel and useful things have happened lately? The only thing I can think of is the potential that SVG (vector graphics) in mozilla offers. RSS, blogs, myspace, and most everything else I can think of just isn't exciting. VoIP has some potential. Wifi has done a lot, but I wonder if the rate of improvement in it will slacken. What else is there?

I think I'll stay with good old Internet (Web 1.3.55.89) for now, thanks.

drwho 12/10/05 07:08:42 AM EST

Yes my heads starts to spin when I read this stuff. My bullshit detectors go off too. But if someone with bags of money decides to start a dotcom 2.0 company in San Francisco and pay me $120,000 per year to go slap together a few applications, I'll pretend I believe.

I feel like I am reading Wired or Mondo 2000 circa 1997 when I read about Web 2.0.

Honestly, though, what novel and useful things have happened lately? The only thing I can think of is the potential that SVG (vector graphics) in mozilla offers. RSS, blogs, myspace, and most everything else I can think of just isn't exciting. VoIP has some potential. Wifi has done a lot, but I wonder if the rate of improvement in it will slacken. What else is there?

I think I'll stay with good old Internet (Web 1.3.55.89) for now, thanks.

cyberdanx 12/10/05 07:06:06 AM EST

Everyone wants to be funding the next Google and is going to be suckered with this Web 2.0.

Hopefully it won't happen but this whole buzz stinks of another bubble beginning to expand quickly, sucking the whole industry into it before finally exploding with a lot of people holding a turkey at the end of it.

The technology and social aspects have their uses, but it's more evolutionary than revolutionary and should be used as such.

peterdaly 12/10/05 07:02:21 AM EST

Web 1.0 - Documents
Web 1.5 - Documents + Web Applications that pretend to be documents
Web 2.0 - Documents + Web applications acting like the interactive applications they are

Web applications are now free from the "static document" paradigm that previous chained them down. The web is no longer pretending to be static. That's not to say Web 2.0 is "mature" by any means, but the groundwork as certainly been laid.

BTW - There are a bunch of concepts and methods here that truly are revolutionary. The more I use it and understand what it means, the more I think Web 2.0 is not a bad name, and may even be justified.

-Pete

SYS-CON Italy News Desk 12/08/05 11:17:49 PM EST

Dion Hinchcliffe's SOA Blog: Five Reasons Why Web 2.0 Matters. Most of us know that the technology industry and the Web are often far out ahead of the mainstream. The fact is that the general public is still struggling with blogs and wikis, much less full blown architectures of participation and software as a service (to name just two aspects of Web 2.0). Not sure about this? Try sampling a few people at random and ask them what a blog is. You will probably be surprised with the answers. Nevertheless, I'm extremely sanguine about Web 2.0 and where it's headed (notwithstanding Bubble 2.0 type events like the RSS Fund assembling a massive $100 million warchest and using it with questionable judgement.)

XML News Desk 12/08/05 11:02:54 PM EST

Dion Hinchcliffe's SOA Blog: Five Reasons Why Web 2.0 Matters. Most of us know that the technology industry and the Web are often far out ahead of the mainstream. The fact is that the general public is still struggling with blogs and wikis, much less full blown architectures of participation and software as a service (to name just two aspects of Web 2.0). Not sure about this? Try sampling a few people at random and ask them what a blog is. You will probably be surprised with the answers. Nevertheless, I'm extremely sanguine about Web 2.0 and where it's headed (notwithstanding Bubble 2.0 type events like the RSS Fund assembling a massive $100 million warchest and using it with questionable judgement.)

SOA Web Services Journal News Desk 12/08/05 10:28:34 PM EST

Dion Hinchcliffe's SOA Blog: Five Reasons Why Web 2.0 Matters. Most of us know that the technology industry and the Web are often far out ahead of the mainstream. The fact is that the general public is still struggling with blogs and wikis, much less full blown architectures of participation and software as a service (to name just two aspects of Web 2.0). Not sure about this? Try sampling a few people at random and ask them what a blog is. You will probably be surprised with the answers. Nevertheless, I'm extremely sanguine about Web 2.0 and where it's headed (notwithstanding Bubble 2.0 type events like the RSS Fund assembling a massive $100 million warchest and using it with questionable judgement.)

@MicroservicesExpo Stories
Microsoft is releasing in the near future Azure Service Fabric as a preview beta. Azure Service Fabric is built to run microservices - a complex application consisting of smaller, interlocked components that enables updating components without disrupting service. Microsoft has used this over the past few years internally for many of its own applications and the new release is for general use, a new product. OSIsoft is an early adopter of this system and run with it to expand into the explo...
ProfitBricks, the provider of painless cloud infrastructure IaaS, today released its SDK for Ruby, written against the company's new RESTful API. The new SDK joins ProfitBricks' previously announced support for the popular multi-cloud open-source Fog project. This new Ruby SDK, which exposes advanced functionality to take advantage of ProfitBricks' simplicity and productivity, aligns with ProfitBricks' mission to provide a painless way to automate infrastructure in the cloud. Ruby is a genera...
Chuck Piluso will present a study of cloud adoption trends and the power and flexibility of IBM Power and Pureflex cloud solutions. Speaker Bio: Prior to Data Storage Corporation (DSC), Mr. Piluso founded North American Telecommunication Corporation, a facilities-based Competitive Local Exchange Carrier licensed by the Public Service Commission in 10 states, serving as the company's chairman and president from 1997 to 2000. Between 1990 and 1997, Mr. Piluso served as chairman & founder of ...
This digest provides an overview of good resources that are well worth reading. We’ll be updating this page as new content becomes available, so I suggest you bookmark it. Also, expect more digests to come on different topics that make all of our IT-hearts go boom!
One of the most frequently requested Rancher features, load balancers are used to distribute traffic between docker containers. Now Rancher users can configure, update and scale up an integrated load balancing service to meet their application needs, using either Rancher's UI or API. To implement our load balancing functionality we decided to use HAproxy, which is deployed as a contianer, and managed by the Rancher orchestration functionality. With Rancher's Load Balancing capability, users ...
Modern Systems announced completion of a successful project with its new Rapid Program Modernization (eavRPMa"c) software. The eavRPMa"c technology architecturally transforms legacy applications, enabling faster feature development and reducing time-to-market for critical software updates. Working with Modern Systems, the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) leveraged eavRPMa"c to transform its Student Information System from Software AG's Natural syntax to a modern application lev...
There is no quick way to learn Jython API but to experiment with it. The easiest way is to start with Jytutor extension for XL Deploy. Now you can also use the code snippet for exposing jython/python context in XL Deploy environment by running it directly in Jytutor Here’s how you can go ahead with that Download the Jytutor extension referring to the Jytutor Blog or from the following link https://github.com/xebialabs-community/xld-jytutor-plugin/releases Shutdown your XL Deploy server...
ProfitBricks has launched its new DevOps Central and REST API, along with support for three multi-cloud libraries and a Python SDK. This, combined with its already existing SOAP API and its new RESTful API, moves ProfitBricks into a position to better serve the DevOps community and provide the ability to automate cloud infrastructure in a multi-cloud world. Following this momentum, ProfitBricks has also introduced several libraries that enable developers to use their favorite language to code ...
ProfitBricks, the provider of painless cloud infrastructure IaaS, announced the launch of its new DevOps Central and REST API, along with support for three multi-cloud libraries and a Python SDK. This, combined with its already existing SOAP API and its new RESTful API, moves ProfitBricks into a position to better serve the DevOps community and provide the ability to automate cloud infrastructure in a multi-cloud world. Following this momentum, ProfitBricks is also today introducing several l...
The 17th International Cloud Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. 17th International Cloud Expo, to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, brings together Cloud Computing, APM, APIs, Microservices, Security, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding bu...
Security is one the more prominent of the application service categories, likely due to its high profile impact. After all, if security fails, we all hear about it. The entire Internet. Forever. So when one conducts a survey on the state of application delivery (which is implemented using application services) you kinda have to include security. Which of course, we did.
SYS-CON Events announced today that MangoApps will exhibit at SYS-CON's 16th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY., and the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MangoApps provides private all-in-one social intranets allowing workers to securely collaborate from anywhere in the world and from any device. Social, mobile, and eas...
Choosing between BIG-IP and LineRate isn't as difficult as it seems.... Our recent announcement of the availability of LineRate Point raised the same question over and over: isn't this just a software-version of BIG-IP? How do I know when to choose LineRate Point instead of BIG-IP VE (Virtual Edition)? Aren't they the same?? No, no they aren't. LineRate Point (and really Line Rate Precision, too) is more akin to an app proxy while BIG-IP VE remains, of course, an ADC (Application Delivery ...
SYS-CON Media announced today that @ThingsExpo Blog launched with 7,788 original stories. @ThingsExpo Blog offers top articles, news stories, and blog posts from the world's well-known experts and guarantees better exposure for its authors than any other publication. @ThingsExpo Blog can be bookmarked. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal and enterprise IT since the creation of the Worldwide Web more than 20 years ago.
No, not the head-banging, gritty, heavy metal Metallica song (though that's certainly awesome too.. excuse me for a moment while I turn it up to 11) but the Puppet as in automation kind of master. The importance placed on APIs - which are key to automation - in our State of Application Delivery 2015 survey was high, with 40% of respondents saying it was important to them that their infrastructure be API-enabled. Automation using those APIs is generally being accomplished through a variety of m...
Containers and microservices have become topics of intense interest throughout the cloud developer and enterprise IT communities. Accordingly, attendees at the upcoming 16th Cloud Expo at the Javits Center in New York June 9-11 will find fresh new content in a new track called PaaS | Containers & Microservices Containers are not being considered for the first time by the cloud community, but a current era of re-consideration has pushed them to the top of the cloud agenda. With the launch ...
The world's leading Cloud event, Cloud Expo has launched Microservices Journal on the SYS-CON.com portal, featuring over 19,000 original articles, news stories, features, and blog entries. DevOps Journal is focused on this critical enterprise IT topic in the world of cloud computing. Microservices Journal offers top articles, news stories, and blog posts from the world's well-known experts and guarantees better exposure for its authors than any other publication. Follow new article posts on T...
Chef and Canonical announced a partnership to integrate and distribute Chef with Ubuntu. Canonical is integrating the Chef automation platform with Canonical's Machine-As-A-Service (MAAS), enabling users to automate the provisioning, configuration and deployment of bare metal compute resources in the data center. Canonical is packaging Chef 12 server in upcoming distributions of its Ubuntu open source operating system and will provide commercial support for Chef within its user base.
In 2015, 4.9 billion connected "things" will be in use. By 2020, Gartner forecasts this amount to be 25 billion, a 410 percent increase in just five years. How will businesses handle this rapid growth of data? Hadoop will continue to improve its technology to meet business demands, by enabling businesses to access/analyze data in real time, when and where they need it. Cloudera's Chief Technologist, Eli Collins, will discuss how Big Data is keeping up with today's data demands and how in t...
So I guess we’ve officially entered a new era of lean and mean. I say this with the announcement of Ubuntu Snappy Core, “designed for lightweight cloud container hosts running Docker and for smart devices,” according to Canonical. “Snappy Ubuntu Core is the smallest Ubuntu available, designed for security and efficiency in devices or on the cloud.” This first version of Snappy Ubuntu Core features secure app containment and Docker 1.6 (1.5 in main release), is available on public clouds, ...