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Vol: 2 Iss: 2

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There's an old story about what happens when several blind men encounter an elephant. One, feeling the leg, says that an elephant is like a tree. Others, touching various other parts of the elephant's anatomy, describe it as other things. The point of the story, besides not hiring b...
Last month in Part I (WSJ Vol. 2 Issue 1) we discussed J2ME and accessing Web services from wireless devices using the XML-RPC protocol. In this article, we will consider SOAP as a vehicle for accessing Web services from wireless devices, comparing and contrast-ing it with XML-RPC....
At the end of my last article (WSJ, Vol. 1, issue 4), I promised that in this article I'd show you an even better way to invoke .NET Web services from Pocket PCs. In addition, before this month's article is finished, you'll learn how to invoke .NET Web services from Java-powered de...
Do you have a .NET Passport identity? You may not realize it, but chances are reasonably high that you do. If you have a HotMail or MSN account, Microsoft assigned a Passport identity to you automatically. Microsoft claims to have more than 160 million users registered in the Passp...
In many respects, Web services are nothing new. They are just a natural evolution of an approach to building systems that dates back 40 years. On the other hand, they hold the promise of truly transforming computing in the same way that client/server computing did over the past 15 ...
One key area in which Microsoft must prove itself is in the security of the data stored by the .NET Services. Because Microsoft is a favorite target of hackers, and the personal, transactional, and payment data will be so valuable, this data store is sure to be plagued by people tr...
Labeled as the coming nirvana for enterprise application integration and business-to-business (B2B) integration, Web services technology is nonetheless vulnerable to a wide array of security threats such as denial of service and spoofing. In this article, we'll review Web services ...
Though often spoken of as a technology of tomorrow, it's important to understand that Web services are already proving to be a key component of some of the products and projects of today. This month's article examines how Web services and .NET are becoming critical components of Pe...
As I speak both formally and informally to developers about Web services, the same questions always come up: Is anyone we know doing it? Don't we have to wait for .NET or the next version of J2EE? Is it secure enough to be trusted? The best way to answer these questions is to look ...
There are plenty of jokes regarding the world of standards development, from 'Standards are like sausages - you're better off not knowing how they were created' to the old-time paradox: 'The good thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from.'
Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) has not yet achieved critical mass as a Web application platform. Today, for example, over 10,000 customers are using BEA WebLogic, the J2EE application server market leader. However, it's a safe bet that J2EE will eventually reach critical mass.
My first thought, when I heard about .NET, was 'Here we go again!' It sounded like yet another attempt on the part of Microsoft to revitalize what appeared to be a fading technology and vision. Increasingly, as a programmer and architect, I was getting the impression that the excit...
Okay, so you've developed what you believe is a useful piece of code and exposed it to the world as a Web service. All comers may now rejoice in the warmth and glow of your artful coding. But who are the people and what are the business systems benefiting from your Web service? Are...
When Borland shipped Delphi 6 in May of last year, one of its new features was support for SOAP - most notably in the form of Web services. Borland Kylix 2 (for Linux) is now also available with the same capabilities, and as I write this article, Borland has just announced the Borl...