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Vol: 4 Iss: 3

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Best Book Understanding Web Services: XML, WSDL, SOAP, and UDDI Addison-Wesley www.aw.com This book introduces the main ideas and concepts behind core and extended Web services technologies and provides developers with a primer for each of the major technologies that have emerged in t...
My involvement in Web services was a mistake. I don't mean that I regret it, just that I got involved in Web services because of a mistake I made. It actually started when I was preparing an executive presentation on the current trends in security. I came across one of those juicy stat...
The Component Based Development Forum, an analyst firm and think tank covering business software creation, reuse, and management, recently wrote, 'Service Orientation - So What?' They went on to explain,
Over the past couple of years, several technology vendors have defined a comprehensive set of specifications that, when complete, will provide an infrastructure for enterprise-class Web services interoperability. The names of these specifications generally begin with 'WS-', so the grou...
As we move from the 'Hello World' days of Web services toward development that can truly support the enterprise, there are some advanced functional requirements for Web services, including secure messaging, reliable messaging, and Web service policies. Since interoperability is the 'Ho...
Since WSJ last looked at Mindreef's SOAPScope back in July '03 (Vol. 3, issue 7), much has been added in functionality and features to benefit the package. New items include integration with Visual Studio .NET, integration with the WS-I testing tools, a new Graph View for looking at hi...
To quote the Scarecrow from the Wizard of Oz, 'There are pieces of me here. There are pieces of me there.' Thanks to years of independent evolution, user identity information also exists with bits and pieces in different places.
Last month (WSJ, Vol. 4, issue 2), we looked at how Web services should not depend on specific security environments and rules but should be managed as part of all of an enterprise's corporate data assets such as Web applications, ERP systems, and in-house applications.
Not surprisingly, Web services management tools are quickly appearing to assist developers and system administrators alike with the maintenance of service-based applications. One such product is AmberPoint Express, a free Web services management and monitoring tool whose mission is to ...
Deploying XML Web services in the enterprise has many compelling advantages. Web services provide a powerful foundation for building loosely coupled distributed applications and service-oriented architectures (SOAs). Enterprises use Web services to lower the integration cost of busines...
Like the hero of a Greek tragedy, Web services' most compelling advantages are simultaneously its most serious dangers. Web services have passed the initial hype cycle. The convergence of industry support, ease of use, and the desire for cost-effective solutions for integration and ser...
One day, Snow White decided to deploy a Web service. Her IT dwarves immediately went to work and were pleasantly surprised to find how easy it was to create the Web service using modern development tools. To Snow White's development dwarves, it almost seemed like magic.
Those in the security business, like me, often complain that security is the last thing that people consider when designing a new application. If a little more thought had gone into the security of the e-mail protocols, for example, it would be easier to trace the true origin of an e-m...
There's a joke in the industry that states that the only really secure computer is in a room where no one is allowed to go. It has no Internet connection, and no network connectivity. It has no monitor, so no one can peek over a user's shoulder to see what is on the screen. And it's no...